Kadima’s Elementary School, Kindergarten through Grade Five, offers a rich and stimulating environment where students are inspired and guided to learn and grow. They develop deep academic skills and foundations, leadership skills and strong character values.

Students are offered a variety of opportunities in which they can express their individuality and deepen their understanding of their own identity. Incorporating best practices of both innovative and traditional education, Kadima has created a dynamic General Studies curriculum incorporating Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, Science, Technology, Health, Visual Arts, Physical Education, Music and Performing Arts. Our integrated program also offers the very best of Hebrew and Judaic Studies education. Students are nurtured by a caring and sensitive faculty, and each child is aware that s/he has a special place in our inspiring community.

 
 
 
Kindergarten

Art

  • Students begin each class by learning about an artist or new art vocabulary.
  • During the year students will learn how to recognize and create patterns and lines in their artwork.
  • They engage in new projects using new art materials such as clay, oil pastels, markers and chalk pastels.
  • They practice using materials like scissors and glue and how to use these tools to accomplish their vision for their artwork.
  • We explore different artists, both Master artists, as well as various Jewish artists, and incorporate their techniques into our own artwork.
  • We use technology to look at these artist.
  • Students learn about the elements of art and incorporate this into their artwork.
  • We discuss the beauty behind each child’s artwork to communicate the vocabulary we have discussed. Each child has the opportunity to share their “likes” with their peers and asses what they like about a friends artwork.
  • Students reinforce their Hebrew vocabulary during art class by using vocab words like colors, shapes, and lines in both Hebrew and English.
  • Students create their own works of work using shapes, color, and texture to express their feelings; combined with the integration of a rich Jewish curriculum.

Example of art projects throughout the year, which may vary, are:

  1. A 2-D animal created from the story of Noah’s Ark, using paper to form a collage and shapes/lines to form the background
  2. A 3-D version of this animal is created using clay
  3. Using their creativity, the kindergartners create their own imaginary animal using new art materials like watercolors and acrylic paints

Special guest artists from other grades and within the community share their expertise and knowledge of a specific field of art, or prior knowledge about a Master artist, enabling students to learn more about the art world.

Hebrew

The Kindergarten Hebrew language program familiarizes students with the sounds and shapes of Hebrew letters. The early literacy skills mastered in Kindergarten through classroom directions, specific units of study and Hebrew songs, permit students to attain the skills needed to begin the first grade Hebrew reading and writing program.

  1. The students will be able to Identify the Phonetic sounds of the entire Alef Bet.
  2. The students will be able to identify in block letters the entire Alef Bet.
  3. The students will understand and will be able to participate in daily calendar/attendance using Hebrew.
  4. The students will be able to talk about the weather, colors, seasons, holiday names, shapes, numbers, directional vocabulary [under, over, before…]

Shabbat and Holidays
The Shabbat and Holidays component of Kindergarten develops skills associated with the practice of the holidays while also introducing students to concepts and symbols. Most importantly students experience the joy of celebration. The study and experiencing of holidays shapes the students identity as they develop a sensory familiarity of the rhythm of the jewish calendar. All holiday study includes music and art related to the holiday.

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur

  1. Skills: blessings over fruit, candles, holiday greetings
  2. Symbols: apples, honey, round challah and pomegranate
  3. Concepts: jewish calendar, forgiveness- understanding and sharing

Sukkot and Simchat Torah

  1. Skills: Brachot- Le’shev ba’sukkah, al ntilat lulav, she'hechiyanu
  2. Symbols: lulav and etrog, four species, sukkah
  3. Concepts: covering the Sukkah[ scach], pilgrimage holidays, the dressings of the Torah [ crown, yad, rimonim], sofer

Chanukah

  1. Skills: brachot [candles]
  2. Symbols: Chanukiah, dreidel, levivot
  3. Concepts: Freedom, the oil story

Tu B’shvat

  1. Skills: Tu b’shvat seder, planting vegetable garden
  2. Symbols: fruits with or without pits, with or without skin
  3. Concepts: nature, planting/ harvesting, change of seasons

Purim

  1. Skills: comprehension of the study using different modalities [ drama, retelling, songs]
  2. Symbols: Megillah, masks, noisemakers
  3. Concepts: characters from the purim story

Pesach

  1. Skills: comprehension of Torah telling of Pesach story, blessing
  2. Symbols: haggadah, charoset, matzah
  3. Concepts: freedom

Yom Ha'atzmaut

  1. Skills: beginning map study of Israel
  2. Symbols: flag, israeli food, Israeli symbol
  3. Concepts: independence with rules

Judaic Studies

In Kindergarten, students explore the Torah stories of Creation, Noah, and Abraham. There is a focus on Jewish holiday blessings, rituals, and traditions. Kadima’s Kindergarten curriculum includes basic Jewish concepts, practices, and experiences. Students will learn about Shabbat and the Jewish holidays in a meaningful and experiential way.  They will explore who they are, and will begin to discover how to identify their Jewish selves. Their natural sense of “wonder” for the world around them will be nurtured.

Torah/Bible Studies

Students begin each Torah class with the blessing, La’asok Bedivrei Torah, creating a special tone of kedusha (holiness) distinguishing Torah study from the rest of the day. Torah studies are integrated into all the disciplines of Language Arts, Hebrew, Art, Science, Music and P.E.

Students will be able to:

  • Recognize life in Biblical times
  • Understand the language of Torah - lack of detail, emotions
  • Get to know the Biblical characters and their actions
  • Connect with God as a spiritual being

Tefillah/Prayer

Students will understand the meaning of certain prayers and connect them to their daily lives as well as recognize and recite morning and Kabbalat Shabbat prayers and songs.

Chuggim/Holiday

Sudents will be able to:

  • Recognize the story of the holiday
  • Recite the holiday blessings
  • Recognize the symbols, customs, and objects relating to each holiday

Kindergarten Mitzvah Project

The Kindergarten mitzvah project is Love on Four Paws focused on Tzedakah (righteousness). Students are encouraged to give Tzedakah every Friday and decorate blankets to donate. This project fosters the mitzvah of Tza’ar Ba’alei Chayim (kindness and responsibility to animals). Parents and other guests are invited into the classroom through the year, Hachnasat Orchim (inviting guests to the classroom) and Derech Eretz (proper conduct; appropriate language and behavior as a religious obligation) are other mitzvot kindergarteners will be focusing on.

Language Arts

Kindergarten addresses a wide range of abilities utilizing differentiation within a balanced literacy approach to support students into becoming independent readers and writers by the end of the year. These methods include phonics skills, spelling and word patterns, guided reading groups, read-alouds, partner reading, independent reading, focused comprehension strategies, grammatical skills, and the writing process.

Comprehension

  • Identify concepts of print
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a story or text
  • Name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each
  • Develop reading and writing behaviors
  • Practice skills of emergent readers
  • Recognize sight words in familiar texts
  • Categorize common objects
  • Build reading muscles
  • Develop habits of avid readers
  • Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet
  • Distinguish words from letters and that words are separated by a space in writing
  • Identify characters, settings, and major events in a story

Composition

  • Explore print strategies
  • Label and list
  • Create writing that others can understand
  • Understand and follow one and two step oral directions
  • Write to teach others
  • Write to persuade others
  • Read  for information (nonfiction texts)
  • Use strategies to tackle tricky words
  • Teach others through writing “All About” Books
  • Explore writing through poetry and song
  • Recognize and produce rhyming words
  • Respond to literature through drawing and phonetic writing

Math

In kindergarten the focus is on developing an understanding of counting, recognizing and writing numbers, patterns, and shapes, adding and subtracting groups, and beginning concepts of measurement.

  • Identify and describe shapes
  • Identify, describe, and extend patterns
  • Identify days of the week and months of the year
  • Count and order to 5 and 10
  • Write numbers from 0 to 20
  • Compare two numbers between 1 and 10
  • Classify and sort objects into categories
  • Understand addition as “putting together” and “adding to”
  • Understand subtraction as “taking apart” and “taking from”
  • Understand symbols in a number sentence
  • Count to 100
  • Understand place value - tens and ones
  • Count to 100 by 5’s and 10’s
  • Identify greater than, less than and equal to
  • Fluently add and subtract within 10
  • Describe and compare measurable attributes of objects

Music

The idea of music training for young children is to begin with things kids enjoy - chant, movement, song, play and fantasy. Coming to music is always  a surprise and they never know what is going to happen. They march to the beat as they enter – we’re moving! Kids love to chant rhymes. Using speech activities children chant their names, play it on pitched and unpitched percussion instruments, and demonstrate loud and soft, fast and slow to make it sound interesting. The children know many games that involve singing, clapping, dancing and storytelling. The first part of the year also involves getting them ready to join services with the “big” kids for Kabbalat Shabbat.

Skills highlighted for this year:

  • Compose own melodies on xylophones based on rhymes and poems
  • Show rhythms and melodies in different ways from writing on paper to playing games
  • Learn to match pitch and sing in tune with a group
  • Utilize the system of solfege exercises (the Do, Re, Mi...)
  • Builds imagination and curiosity while exploring their creative side
  • Explore and create body movements related to a steady beat and musical phrasing

Science

The kindergarten students are introduced to fundamental processes and practices in scientific inquiry through FOSS (Full Option Science System), a research-based science curriculum for grades K-8. It was developed at the University of California, Berkeley and provides tools and strategies to engage students in experiences that lead to deeper understanding of the world around us. The three units of study are: Animals, Two by Two, Trees, and Materials and Motion.   

  • Identify characteristics of different animals
  • Compare and contrast real animals and animals in stories
  • Understand seasons and weather change
  • Observe common objects by using the five senses
  • Describe the properties of common objects
  • Compare and sort common objects*
  • Communicate observations orally and through drawings*
  • Identify characteristics of different plants
  • Identify structures of plants
  • Identify different states of water
  • Identify characteristics of land and water
  • Describe objects using the materials they are made of
  • Identify resources on Earth and how they can be conserved

*Skills to be taught throughout the year

Social Studies

Students explore the concepts of individual rights and responsibilities as they relate to their local and broader communities. Students learn about various community roles including discussion of individual responsibility, collaboration and connection with other community members, common goals, and ideas including fair play, good sportsmanship, and respect for the rights and opinions of others. The students examine historical and current events and contributors.

  • Identify community helpers and what they do for the community
  • Master patriotic songs
  • Recognize national and state symbols
  • Identify importance of American holidays and the people they honor
  • Understand seasons and weather change
  • Distinguish between land and water on maps and globes
  • Locate where we live on maps and globes
  • Compare and contrast types of communities
  • Compare past and present
  • Study transportation methods

 

 
1st Grade

Art

As students progress from Kindergarten to First Grade, they learn to express their observations of artwork more vocally. We incorporate more art terminology in these observations and integrate Hebrew into the program.

  • Students use the Jewish holidays, such as Sukkot and Tu’Bishvat, to create artwork that have patterns found throughout nature and the environment, using paints to help add texture throughout their pieces of artwork.

  • The elements of art are also discussed throughout the year as we put more emphasis on line, color, shape, and form.

  • Each class begins with a discussion about an artist or style of art which then moves into the elements of art; including lines, shape, color, texture and patterns.

  • Projects of interest this year include a discussion about Jewish holidays, like Shabbat. We discuss what makes Shabbat different from other holidays and  dive deeper into the Jewish traditions held by each family. Students create their own 3-D Shabbat candlesticks and represent them and their Jewish identity. We add a modern twist to this Jewish artifact by learning about various artist and intertwining the lesson together.

  • We discuss the use of colors and how they can evoke a feeling, and then incorporate this into artwork created throughout the year.

  • Students use paint to create a color wheel and experiment with different paints such as finger paints, tempera paints and watercolor paints.

  • Learning about Jewish holidays, like Shabbat and Tu Bi'Shevat, allows student to create a still life of flourishing plants and vases full of flowers using primary and secondary colors.

  • We learn about texture through the use of our environment and plants to add dimension to this piece of artwork.

  • Students incorporate the Jewish holiday of Sukkot into their work or art while also learning about fruits and vegetables grown during the fall. Students use new art tools, like oil pastels and blending tools to create shadows onto their artwork.

  • Students learn to distinguish the difference between seascapes, landscapes portraits and a still life. We use Jewish stories found in the Torah and paintings from Master artists to help us distinguish these subject matters.

  • Learning about other cultures helps students gain a better understanding to the work around them. This becomes integral, as we introduce an art project from another country, for example creating Japanese inspired coy fish on parchment paper.

  • As the year progresses we discuss WHY we are making something and the relevance it has to art and use art terms to discuss.

  • We also learn to look at our artwork with more focus and say our likes and dislike, critiquing our own artwork.

Projects of interest this year includes a discussion about Jewish holidays, like Shabbat. We discuss what makes Shabbat different from other holidays and dove deeper into the Jewish traditions held by each family. Students created their own 3-D Shabbat candlesticks that represented them and their Jewish identity. We add a modern twist to this Jewish artifact by learning about various artist and intertwining the lesson together.

Hebrew

First grade utilizes the Tal Am program based on the principles of communicative-heritage language development. Kadima creates an engaging visual and oral Hebrew environment which is mirrored in program materials including colorful workbooks and classroom charts, audio C.D.’s, and library books. Materials, like library books, are sent home with the children extending Hebrew language acquisition into the home.

The language development portion of Tal Am is organized into the following work books:

  1. Ariot 1 Students learn the letters Alef-He and Shin and the vowels Patach, Kamatz, Sh’va, and Chirik.
  2. Ariot 2 Students learn the letters Vav to Yod and the vowels Cholam, Zere, and Sagol.
  3. Ariot 3 Students learn the letters Kaf to Ayin and the vowels Kubutz and Shuruk.
  4. Ariot 4 Students learn the letters Peh to Taf.
  5. Ariot Kotev Students practice reading and writing in capital letters, repeating vocabulary and language structures taught in Ariot 1-4.

Tal Am offers the following materials for a complete school year:

  • Interactive Posters
  • C.D’s – including songs, stories, and dictations to develop listening and comprehension skills (students take home the C.D’s to share with their families as well as use them to practice reading skills).
  • Library - age relevant stories for literacy development
  • Big Books - including theme stories, library books, songs, and plays
  • Games - for language acquisition, reinforcement, and enrichment of content and skills
  • The Album Hakita (the class album) - a collaborative effort in which all of the students in the class are given pictures of themselves during various events throughout the school year and have the opportunity to write about those events

Holidays

  1. Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur - Students review blessing learned in Kindergarten, the blessings for hearing the shofar, and Yehee R’atzone. Recognize symbols like apples, honey, round challah, shofar, pomegranate, and greeting cards. Learn the concept of Tashlich, forgiveness, good deeds, the ten days of repentance, seasons, calender (Elul and Tishrai), and Yonah.
  2. Sukkot and Simchat Torah – Student learn the blessing Mashiv Haruach oo Moreed Hageshem, blessing for the candles, blessing for the Sukkah, and specifications for building a sukkah. Recognize symbols like apples, honey, round challah, shofar, pomegranate, and greeting cards. Learn the concept of [the] “seven days you shall sit in the sukkah”, Oushpizin, and Hakafot.
  3. Chanukkah – Learn the blessings over candles, miracles, and “she'hechiyanu.” Recognize symbols such as Chanukia, Sevivon (dreidle), Levivot (latkes), Sufganiot, Menorah, Shamash, Nerot (candles), Cad Shemen, Beit Hamicdash, and Maccabi. Explore the concepts of Freedom, Victory, and the oil story.
  4. Tu Bi’Shevat – Students learn all about planting trees and conducting a Tu Bi’Shevat seder. Recognizing the Etz, geza, shoresh, anaf, aleh, perach, pri, zerah,adama, and shkedia. Learn the concepts of eating fruits from the land of Israel, giving charity to Israel, to purchase trees.
  5. Purim – Students learn the story of (and songs about) Purim. Identify the symbols of Masechah (mask), Megilat Ester, Ra’ashan, Ozney Haman, Leitzan,melech, Malka, and Mishloach Manot. Explore the concept of “Venahafoch Hu” (from sorrow to joy).
  6. Pesach to Shavuot – Students will tell the story of Pesach, the order of the Seder, brachot over wine, candles, carpas, hamotze, bitter herbs, matzah, birchat hamazon, pri ha’adama, kiddush, the four questions, halel, and giving the Torah. Students will be able to count the Omer (the days between Pesach and Shavuot). Recognize the symbols Haggadah, Aviv (spring), Slaves, Beoor Hametz, the Pesach plate, Chag matan torah, and the five books of the Torah. Explore the concepts of Freedom and “Torah Tsiva Lanu Moshe.”
  7. Yom Ha’ Atzmaut – Students read the map of Israel and Jerusalem and learn prayers for the state of Israel. Recognize the symbols for the flag and Hatikvah. Explore the concept of independence.

Hebrew writing and phonetic reading skills are developed through the Tal Am materials entitled: Ariot Koreh Vekotev. The unit contains materials for acquiring phonetic reading in a meaningful way, as well as activities for the development of writing and verbal skills.

Judaic Studies

First grade Judaic Studies is full of exciting and meaningful learning experiences. The school’s goal is to create an environment where children grow academically, socially, and emotionally. In the First Grade Judaic Studies program, students will become familiar with the daily Shacharit, morning service. They participate in tefillah on Mondays and Wednesdays and Kabbalat Shabbat on Fridays.

Students gain a greater understanding of the meaning and personal relevance of the tefillot. The culmination of the year is a celebration of their understanding of tefillot during a special Siddur ceremony. During this ceremony, students receive their own siddur. They will learn the key values, customs, blessings, and meaning of all the Jewish holidays.  Through the tefillot and the daily practice of their meanings, students are guided to become ethical and moral human beings, committed to Tikkun Olam.

Tefillah/Prayer

Students will be able to:

  • Recite prayers

  • Understand meaning and relevance of prayers

  • Connect prayers to daily lives

  • Lead a Shacharit, morning prayer service

  • Understand religious, historical, and Biblical importance of Shabbat

Chuggim/Holiday

Students will be able to:

  • Identify holiday customs and traditions

  • Connect the holiday story to the reasons behind the customs and traditions

  • Recognize and recite the appropriate Jewish holiday blessings

  • Identify appropriate symbols and what they represent

First Grade Mitzvah Project

In first grade, students support the organization, “Challenged Athletes Foundation,” supporting people with physical disabilities. By aiding this foundation, students in first grade will be performing the mitzvah of lifnei iver lo titten michshol, which translates to, “Not placing a stumbling block before the blind (Leviticus 19:14).” First grade supports this organization by bringing tzedakah every Friday and organizing a jog-a-thon to raise money. Guests from the CAF are invited to speak with Kadima students about their disabilities and how they accomplish their goals.

Language Arts

Reading

Launching Readers Workshop

  • Understand the routines and procedures
  • Establish rules and expectations for self
  • Establish rules and expectations for partner work

Building Good Habits

  • Identify words in poems and stories that show feelings
  • Use illustrations to better understand writings
  • Confirm predictions while reading
  • Read longer and stronger
  • Tackle hard words
  • Use partners to build good habits

Nonfiction

  • Retell main topic with supporting details
  • Use various text structures and features to locate key information
  • Identify why author wrote the book
  • Gain knowledge of nonfiction materials through reading
  • Tackle super hard words in order to keep learning
  • Read aloud like experts

Big Jobs- Fluency, Comprehension, Phonics

  • Understand the basic of words (syllables, sounds, long and short vowels, blends)
  • Know and apply decoding skills (silent e, endings, common misspelled words)
  • Read with fluency to support comprehension
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in stories
  • Use skills to better understand readings
  • Self-monitor to check comprehension
  • Add more tools to read really hard words and books

Characters

  • Describe characters, setting, plot in stories
  • Use prior knowledge to better understand
  • Go on adventures through the readings
  • Notice more as they read and reread
  • Understand characters deeper
  • Note changes in characters thoughts, feelings, actions
  • Learn important lessons by examining characters thoughts
  • Share opinions about books

Fairy Tales

  • Compare and contrast similar stories from different countries
  • Identify key elements of stories
  • Identify who is telling the story
  • Retell stories while understanding message or lesson

Writing

Launching Writers Workshop

  • Understand the routines and procedures
  • Establish rules and expectations for self
  • Establish rules and expectations for partner work

Small Moments

  • Write narrative with 2 or more events with a flow and closure

How to Books

  • Write explanatory texts about a topic and support with facts

Opinion

  • Write responses to literature including opinion and support from the text

Fairy Tales

  • Describe characters, settings, major events in own writings
  • Demonstrate use of conventions (upper and lower case letters, commas, singular and plural nouns, verbs, adjectives, conjunctions, sentence types, punctuation, contractions)

Math

  • Basic addition – addends/sums
  • write numbers properly
  • recognize two small numbers when added equal a bigger number
  • memorize +0 facts
  • Simple subtraction - recognize taking a small number from a big number leaves a small number
  • Memorize +1 and +10 facts
  • Addition with doubles and neighbors facts
  • Use memorized double facts to figure out other facts
  • Memorize double and neighbor facts
  • Subtraction - use addition to help subtraction
  • Memorize +2 and +3 facts
  • Fact Families - understand that 3 numbers can mix and match to make 4 math sentences
  • Memorize +4 facts
  • Patterns -2,5,10 - use patterns to count to 120
  • Understand patterns on the 100s chart
  • Place Value
  • Understand the meaning of the digits in tens and ones spots
  • Memorize +5 and +6 facts
  • Place Value to hundreds - write 3 digit numbers in drawing, math sentence, or expanded form
  • Identify which  numbers are Greater than and Less than
  • Memorize +7 and +8 facts
  • Double digit addition - add 2 two digit numbers with and without regrouping
  • Time - Tell time to hour, half hour and possibly quarter
  • Memorize 9 facts
  • Measurement - identify which tools to use  for length, weight and capacity
  • Money - identify and add coins and dollars
  • Math Fact Fluency
  • Graphing - read and create pictographs, bar graphs and tally charts
  • Geometry - identify 2D and 3D shapes
  • Use proper vocabulary (vertex, face, etc)
  • Math Fact fluency
  • Fractions - understand one whole can be broken into smaller equal pieces
  • Math Fact Fluency

Music

Using the same building blocks, concepts and instruments from Kindergarten, but the music will be more developed. Students continue to solidify a sense of Rhythm and pitch and are ready for more sophisticated music and orchestration. Rhymes, poems and folk songs provide text for musical improvisation. During the year the children begin to sing simple canons/rounds. Continued progress in the area of “keeping the beat” to music is used in circle games stressing eye-hand coordination, both with and without instruments, and while singing. The First Graders also take part in their siddur ceremony by leading a Shacharit (morning service) for their family and friends.  We spend a lot of time during the year to prepare them in hebrew and performance.

Skills highlighted for this year:

  • Show musical form with a dance, a picture, with letters, or objects to make up music of our own in form like AB or ABA or ABACA (rondo form)
  • Playing patterns on xylophones faster and with proper mallet technique
  • Explore opportunities for creative and expressive movement
  • Compose more advanced combinations of rhythmic and melodic patterns on Orff instruments
  • Sing combinations of solfege syllables (Do, Re, Mi, So, La) with hand signs
  • Experiencing collaboration with peers

Science

Solids and liquids

  • Understand materials come in different forms (solid and liquid)
  • Make materials change from one form to another

Air and Weather

  • Understand materials come in different forms
  • Weather can be measured and described

Plants and Animals

  • Plants and animals meet their needs in similar and different ways

Social Studies

Continents, maps

  • Locate 7 continents and 4 oceans
  • Compare and contrast 2D and 3D maps and derive information
  • Construct a simple map

Native Americans and National Holidays

  • Understand ways in which American Indians and immigrants helped each other
  • Understand significance of holidays and achievements of people associated

US Symbols

  • Identify American symbols, landmarks, documents (flag, bald eagle, Statue of Liberty)

Different Cultures around the world

  • Describe how location, weather, physical environment affect people (food, clothing, shelter, transportation, etc.)
  • Examine structures of schools and communities around the world
  • Recognize  how people share things even if from different cultures
  • Compare beliefs, customs, ceremonies, traditions of various cultures

Exchange/Money

  • Understand the concept of exchange and use of money to purchase goods
 
 
 
 
2nd Grade

Art

  • During the advancement of art in this primary grade, student learn to use art as a form of communication.

  • We express our observations through art terms and vocabulary.

  • Students gain a better understanding of the art mediums being used and their purpose in creating a piece of artwork.

  • Students learn about the history of Jerusalem and discuss Israeli artists. We discuss how the landscape of Jerusalem differs from other cities.

  • The second graders learn the Hebrew word of love and what that mean to them as a Jewish community member.

  • We discuss how warm and cool colors can evoke different feelings and how this can be used to express the emotion of love.

  • Students create the skill of printmaking by using rubbings and stencil as a starting point. We incorporate this technique into our artwork throughout the year.

  • We learn about the word balance and discuss how to incorporate this into a work of art. Through our study of Jerusalem, we create a beautiful collage of buildings and colors and use various techniques, like overlapping to create a balance throughout their artwork.

  • In their pieces of artwork each student uses a variety of art mediums, such as oil pastels, watercolors and tempera paints.

  • Students reveal that art is a part of who we are and we can use it to express ourselves in many different ways.

  • Students will learn how to identify lines, geometric shapes, warm and cool colors and textures throughout work.

Hebrew

The Tal Am program is divided into two based tracks:

  1. Tov Bakita U’Babait: Daily life in the class, at home, and outdoors
  2. The Jewish year: The High Holidays

The Tal Am program is structured so that each year the vocabulary of the previous year is reviewed as new words are added. The consistent structure throughout the units eases comprehension and provides comfort in producing a foreign language in a familiar system.

Learning takes place through experiential activities, reading, singing, acting, art, and creative writing. There is an evaluative test at the end of each unit to assess reading comprehension, grammar, verb patterns, and vocabulary.

Tov Bakita U’Babait

This unit explore concepts of friendship, the balance between daily routine and special activities, suitability of clothing to season, events and activities, and family relationships. The unit includes a poem and songs.

  • Vocabulary
  • Grammar: pronouns, verbs, singular and plural, masculine and feminine, opposites
  • Book reports from the variety of library books in class [writing small paragraphs]
  • Conversation - conducted only in Hebrew

Holidays

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur

  • Skills: Master the prayers: Yehee Ratzone, she'hechiyanu, blessing for candles, wine, and challah, Avinu malcanu, Kiddush for Rosh Hashanah, and Tashlich
  • Concepts: Calendar - the month of Tishrai, the cycle of the moon
  • Symbols: Pomegranates, fish head, apples and honey, round challah, different names of the holiday

Sukkot and Simchat Torah

  • Skills: Blessing for the Sukkah, candles, blessings for reading the Torah, blessing for the four species
  • Symbols: Four species, Torah, oushpizin
  • Concepts: Oushpizin [welcoming guests]

Chanukkah

  • Skills: Reciting the blessings over the candles, playing the sevivon [driedel], Chanukkah songs
  • Symbols: Chanukia, Menorah, oil, Beit Hamikdash
  • Concepts: Religious freedom, miracle, heroism

Tu Bi’Shevat

  • Skills: Holiday blessings, growing seeds, Tu Bi'Shevat songs, seder
  • Symbols: Parts of the tree, Tzedakah box
  • Concepts: Nature, Environment

Purim

  • Skills: Holiday blessings, songs
  • Symbols: Grager, ozney haman [hamentashen], mask, megillah
  • Concepts: Ve’naafoch hoo [from sadness to happiness]

Pesach

  • Skills: Story of exodus, explaining the holiday symbols, songs, conducting a Seder, different names of Pesach
  • Symbols: Seder plate [zroha, egg, charoset, karpas, bitter herbs, matzah], Elijah's cup, wine, afikoman
  • Concepts: Freedom, slavery, seder [order], spring, family celebration

Yom Ha'atzmaut

  • Skills: Recognizing the map of Israel, singing the Israeli national anthem [hatikvah]
  • Symbols: The flag of Israel, semel Israel [the emblem of the state of Israel]
  • Concepts: Independence

Shavuot

  • Skills: Identify the seven minim [fruits, plants of Israel], Torah blessing
  • Symbols: Torah, bikurim basket, ten commandments.
  • Concepts: Matan Torah [the receiving of the Torah], Thanksgiving harvest [Katzir], eating dairy, dress in white

Judaic Studies

The Second Grade Judaic Studies program helps to foster students’ Jewish identity by encouraging children to explore their Jewish roots and traditions in a fun and exciting manner. Judaic studies is integrated into the second grade daily program thus making the study of Judaism relevant and meaningful to the children's everyday lives. The school’s goal is for students to develop a true appreciation of their heritage and understand the need for continued, lifelong Jewish study. Students take their first steps in the development of Biblical literacy and in the acquisition of Biblical Hebrew. In addition to studying authentic Biblical text, students use music, games, and visual aids to develop a keen understanding of Jewish concepts and values. Deep discussions surrounding the holidays, key laws, traditions, and brachot help students connect the ideas and values represented in their lives today.

Students attend weekday tefillot, and Shabbat services where they delve into the deeper meanings of the teffilot and attempt to create personal connections to the text. Students are challenged to connect values inherent in the tefillot with actions in their daily lives. Both the kevah (routine) and kavannah (intentions) of the liturgy are emphasized.

Torah/Bible Studies

The Matok Torah Program focuses on the first two Parshiot of Sefer Bereshit; Bereshit, and Noah.

Students will be able to:

  • View Torah as kadosh (holy)

  • Read Torah in an inquiring, deep, and reverent way

  • Learn Torah using original Hebrew text

  • Develop literary skills to study Torah independently

  • Engage in critical thinking

  • Search for personal meaning in Torah

  • Connect Torah with their lives as Jews

  • Engage with questions about God

  • Grapple with moral issues that arise from the Torah

  • Recognize and identify with Biblical characters

Tefillah/Prayer

Students will be able to:

  • Understand the meaning and relevance of prayer in an age appropriate manner

  • Relate prayers to daily lives

  • Understand meaning of keywords

  • Explore relationship with God

  • Use prayer as a spiritual self-expression

  • Perform correct choreography of prayers

  • Be familiar with the matbeah (structure) of prayer services

Chuggim/Holiday

Students will be able to:

  • Recognize and recite the appropriate Jewish holiday prayers

  • Identify appropriate symbols and what they represent

  • Identify appropriate holiday customs and traditions

  • Relate holiday stories to present day situations

Second Grade Mitzvah Project

The second grade mitzvah project raises tzedakah for, “Guide Dogs of America.” Guide Dogs of America is dedicated to providing guide dogs (and instruction in their use) free of charge, to blind and visually impaired men and women from the United States and Canada so that they may continue to pursue their goals with increased mobility and independence. By supporting this organization, the second graders are fulfilling two important mitzvot: Ezrah Lezulot (Helping Others) and Tza'ar ba'alei chayim (showing compassion for living creatures). Students make and sell dog shaped cookies to raise money for their organization.

Language Arts

Using the philosophy of Readers and Writers Workshop, the focus on language arts in 2nd grade is learning to read fluently with accuracy and expression, comprehend and discuss a variety of texts, and produce narrative, informative, and persuasive writings. In this light, students engage in reading, discussing, and writing about texts within many genres. They work on improving their reading comprehension skills by participating in homogenous partner work and meeting with the teacher alone or in a group to hone in on a specific skill. As they learn to become fluent readers, 2nd graders make connections between culture and the stories they produce. Additionally, the 2nd graders’ writing expectations expand to ask students to show evidence of the writing process while being exposed to a variety of mini lessons. The 2nd graders are building their decoding and fluency skills and increasing their vocabulary in both their reading and writing practice with a  focus on selecting the best word within a given context. Students practice writing for sustained amounts of time, focus on understanding figurative language such as idioms, and integrating dialogue in their writing. Throughout the course of the 2nd grade year, students become more sophisticated and independent in discussion, understanding concepts of character development, and learn to take notes from a text. This year also focuses on the introduction of improving presentation skills.

Skills we focus on include the following:

Research:

  • Engage in individual and collaborative small group research and writing projects.

  • Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources.

  • With scaffolded support such as graphic organizers, take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

  • Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.

  • With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

  • Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).

  • Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue.

Comprehension:

  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

  • Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

  • Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

  • Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

  • Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

  • Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

  • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

  • Build on others’ talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others.

  • Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion.

  • Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue.

  • Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.

  • Use glossaries and beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in all content areas. CA

  • Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.

  • Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.

  • Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., describe foods that are spicy or juicy).

  • Distinguish shades of meaning among closely related verbs (e.g., toss, throw, hurl) and closely related adjectives (e.g., thin, slender, skinny, scrawny).

  • Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

  • Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known prefix is added to a known word (e.g., happy/unhappy, tell/retell).

  • Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with the same root (e.g., addition, additional).

  • Use knowledge of the meaning of individual words to predict the meaning of compound words  (e.g., birdhouse, lighthouse, housefly; bookshelf, notebook, bookmark).

Composition:

  • Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.

  • Plan and deliver a narrative presentation that: recounts a well-elaborated event, includes details, reflects a logical sequence, and provides a conclusion.

  • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. CA

  • Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense

  • Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.

  • Exploring varieties of genres (through animal research and fables)

  • Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See grade 2 Language standards  1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

  • Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.

  • Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

  • With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

  • With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.

  • Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

  • Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

  • Compare formal and informal uses of English.

  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

  • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  • Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.

  • Give and follow three- and four-step oral directions. CA

  • Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.

  • Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic

  • Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.

  • Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.

  • Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section.

Math

In 2nd grade the mathematical focus is on developing an understanding of place value to the thousands, adding and subtracting up to 1,000, multiplying by 2s, 5s, and 10s, developing an understanding of fractions, describing and analyzing the specific properties of polygons, and develop an understanding of area.

As a result of the program, students will:

  • Use patterns to express multiplication problems for the numbers 2, 5, and 10 and their solutions
  • Round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100 to advance their skills in estimation
  • Apply mathematical properties of addition and subtraction to simplify problems
  • Model, solve, and pose a variety of story problems to construct meaning for the operations of addition and subtraction
  • Understand and efficiently apply various fraction models
  • Classify and categorize polygons, particularly quadrilaterals
  • Calculate perimeter and area of polygons
  • Understand place value: Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
  • Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work, using place value and the properties of operations.

Represent and Interpret Data:

  • Record numerical data in systematic ways, keeping track of what has been counted.

  • Represent the same data set in more than one way (e.g., bar graphs and charts with tallies).

  • Identify features of data sets (range and mode).

  • Recognize, describe, and extend patterns and determine a next term in linear patterns (e.g., 4, 8, 12…; the number of ears on one hourse, two horses, three horses, four horses).

  • Solve problems involving simple number patterns.

  • Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with sing-unit scale) to represent a data set with us to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.

Recognize and Draw Shapes:

  • Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.

  • Understand and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., an opposite number sentence for 8 + 6 = 14 is 14 - 6 = 8) to solve problems and check solutions.

Exploration:

  • Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction

  • Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawing and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

  • Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawing and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens and hundreds.

  • Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10, 100, or 1000.

  • Use place value understanding to add and subtract

  • Measure and estimate lengths

  • Measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen.

  • Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters, and meters.

  • Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit.

  • Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems involving lengths that are given in the same unit, e.g., by using drawing (such as drawings of rulers) and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.  

  • Relate addition and subtraction to length

  • Divide a rectangle into rows and columns  

  • Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.

  • Count within 1000; skip-count by 2s, 5s, 10s, and 100s. (exceeds CCSS)

Growth and Change

  • Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multliplication

  • Use estimation strategies to make reasonable estimates

  • Work with time and money

  • Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes

  • Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?

Fractions

  • Partition circles and rectangles into 2s, 3s, and 4s

  • Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.

  • Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram.

  • Represent a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line.

  • Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.

Music

Improving solfege singing, singing in unison, solo singing and counterpoint, to perform beautiful music. As a group, we study our first wind instrument together, the recorder. The recorder is an easy instrument to learn and will give children the basic skills they will need to study other wind instruments in the future. Simple songs played on the recorder can also be played on the Orff instruments. They even sound good together. Dance and creative movement are  inspired by visual arts, folk, classical and popular music.

Skills highlighted for this year:

  • Through music, we practice working together, sharing responsibility and compromising with others to accomplish a common goal
  • Identify and perform time signatures in music such as 2/4, 3/4, 4/4
  • Expand vocal range
  • Improvise and create ostinato patterns
  • Define phrase lengths and the ability to listen and recognize changes in musical quality, tempo, and melody

Science

Through an integrated science lesson, students in 2nd grade understand topics through a hands-on and inquiry-based approach in which they study concepts including the foundation of human resources, engineering design, and ecosystems and the environmental impacts on organisms, and life cycles. This integrated course will requires students to ask and answer questions about the topics they are studying, conduct short research projects, and take brief notes utilizing evidence from their inquiries.

At the conclusion of the course, students will understand the following units, including but not limited to:

Physical Sciences

The motion of objects can be observed and measured. As a basis for understanding this concept, students:

  • Locating the position of an object by describing it in relation to another object or to the background.
  • Record and describe an object's motion and the change in position of the object over time.
  • Change the movement of something by giving it a push or a pull. The size of the change is related to the strength, or the amount of force, of the push or pull.
  • Know tools and machines are used to apply pushes and pulls (forces) to make things move.
  • Know objects fall to the ground unless something holds them up.
  • Use magnets to make some objects move without being touched.
  • Vibrate objects to make sounds and describe by its pitch and volume.

Life Sciences

Plants and animals have predictable life cycles. As a basis for understanding this concept:

  • Understand that organisms reproduce offspring of their own kind and that the offspring resemble their parents and one another.
  • Sequence the stages of life cycles for different animals, such as butterflies, frogs, and mice.
  • Know many characteristics of an organism are inherited from the parents. Some characteristics are caused or influenced by the environment.
  • Understand that there is variation among individuals of one kind within a population.
  • Compare light, gravity, touch, or environmental stress and know they can affect the germination, growth, and development of plants.
  • Know flowers and fruits are associated with reproduction in plants.

Earth Sciences

Earth is made of materials that have distinct properties and provide resources for human activities. As a basis for understanding this concept:

  • Compare the physical properties of different kinds of rocks and know that rock is composed of different combinations of minerals.
  • Know smaller rocks come from the breakage and weathering of larger rocks.
  • Students know that soil is made partly from weathered rock and partly from organic materials and that soils differ in their color, texture, capacity to retain water, and ability to support the growth of many kinds of plants.
  • Students know that fossils provide evidence about the plants and animals that lived long ago and that scientists learn about the past history of Earth by studying fossils.
  • Students know rock, water, plants, and soil provide many resources, including food, fuel, and building materials, that humans use.

Investigation and Experimentation

Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will:

  • Make predictions based on observed patterns and not random guessing.
  • Measure length, weight, temperature, and liquid volume with appropriate tools and express those measurements in standard metric system units.
  • Compare and sort common objects according to two or more physical attributes (e. g., color, shape, texture, size, weight).
  • Write or draw descriptions of a sequence of steps, events, and observations.
  • Construct bar graphs to record data, using appropriately labeled axes.
  • Use magnifiers or microscopes to observe and draw descriptions of small objects or small features of objects.
  • Follow oral instructions for a scientific investigation.

Social Studies

2nd grade focuses on the relationship between geography, economics, and history in relation to indigenous people who shaped our current landscape. Students are also exposed to and explore issues of various communities with a focus on the Los Angeles community. Students will identify influential events of the past and present, and learn examples of honesty, courage, and determination. Understand the importance of individual action and character, the 2nd grader social studies curriculum also introduces students to concepts of the beginnings of our nation (indigenous populations) and our city (Los Angeles history), as they continue to improve upon their note-taking skills, visual and oral presentation of information, and increased independence in research and use of evidence.

Skills we focus on include the following:

Differentiate Between Long Ago and Yesterday

  • Understand the significance of our national holidays and the heroism and achievements of the people associated with them.
  • Understand the ways in which American Indians and immigrants have helped define Californian and American culture.

Demonstrate Map Skills

  • Compare the information that can be derived from a three-dimensional model to the information that can be derived from a picture of the same location.

  • Locate on a simple letter-number grid system the specific locations and geographic features in their neighborhood or community (e.g., map of the classroom, the school).

  • Label from memory a simple map of the North American continent, including the countries, oceans, Great Lakes, major rivers, and mountain ranges. Identify the essential map elements: title, legend, directional indicator, scale, and date.

Understand the Importance of Individual Action and Character

  • Understand the importance of individual action and character and explain how heroes from long ago and the recent past have made a difference in others' lives (e.g., from biographies of Abraham Lincoln, Louis Pasteur, Sitting Bull, George Washington Carver, Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Golda Meir, Jackie Robinson, Sally Ride).

  • Learn examples of honesty, courage, determination, individual responsibility, and patriotism in world history from stories and folklore.

Explain Governmental Institutions and Practices

  • Explain how the United States and other countries make laws, carry out laws, determine whether laws have been violated, and punish wrongdoers.

  • Describe the ways in which groups and nations interact with one another to try to resolve problems in such areas as trade, cultural contacts, treaties, diplomacy, and military force.

Understand Basic Economic Concepts

  • Understand the concept of exchange and the use of money to purchase goods and services.

  • Identify the specialized work that people do to manufacture, transport, and market goods and services and the contributions of those who work in the home.

  • Understand the role and interdependence of buyers (consumers) and sellers (producers) of goods and services.

  • Understand how limits on resources affect production and consumption (what to produce and what to consume).


 

 
3rd Grade

Art

  • Students will learn how to draw a variety of items, including a still life comprised of secular and Jewish traditional objects.

  • We will further discuss how to add shading to give each artwork dimension.

  • We will use various paints to create analogous color schemes found in nature during Sukkot.

  • Students create an imaginative clay or 3-D sculpture based on an organic form.

  • Each student learns to question the art process and discovers new art materials and techniques.

  • Students learn to also compare artworks with similar themes and during different time periods, such as Marc Chagal’s paintings and Pablo Picasso’s artwork.

  • We look at various secular and Jewish artists and discuss art traditions.

  • We positively critique one another’s artwork and reach for art vocabulary words to express interest in a peers creation.

Hebrew

Tal Am is a continuation of Tal Am 1 and 2, connected both in skills and in the content of the Everyday life and Holidays, while elevating the level of study. Tal Am 3 is organized in three discipline-based tracks, aligned to reinforce the development of learning, thinking and language skills. The brain-based design of the material and congruence and alignment of its content and skills contribute to the acceleration of the learning process.

  1. Be’atzlacha Etzlenu Bakita
  2. Holidays

The two units are organized in two discipline-based tracks: aligned to reinforce the development of learning and thinking/language skills.

Tal Am is comprised of the following materials:

  • For Students: Workbooks and CDs for acquisition, mastery and creativity, guided readers, and summative assessment.
  • For the Classroom: Interactive posters, flash cards, games, library books for reading reinforcement and enrichment.
  • Story album and dictionary for a memory box: A tool documenting students’ achievements in content and communication skills [reading, writing, and speaking.]
  • The memory box will develop the student’s knowledge and abilities in a deliberate, coordinated, and connected way from year to year.

The unit consists of the following learning materials: Workbooks, books for guided reading, library books, projects library books, CD, flash cards,  and classroom posters.

Be’atzlacha Etzlenu Bakita [Everyday Life]

  • The Memory Box: Helping students recollect what they learned in the past and retain new knowledge acquired throughout the school year.
  • The rules for successful learning and the ways to ensure fruitful and productive study.
  • The deeper acquaintance with the students of the Virtual Classroom: their distinctive characteristics, hobbies, etc. through which the children are encouraged to become active observers of the people and things surrounding them.

The High Holidays and Chanukkah

  • The High Holidays unit presents prayers and blessings specific to these holidays, introducing the biblical and historical background of each holiday.
  • The Chanukkah unit reviews the concepts studied in previous years and introduces another dimension derived from the holiday’s historical setting [Halacha and Talmud.]

Tu Bi'Shevat

  • Lesson begins with the Memory Box and with the reasoning started in the Mishna for designating the 15th of Shevat as the date on which the holiday is celebrated.
  • The unit focuses on the concept of machzorim- the cycles existing in our environment: the water cycle, the vegetation cycle and the cycles of the week, month, and year. The unit presents the significance of these cycles in our lives and their representation in Jewish life [blessings and mitzvot], as well as the mitzvot and customs of Tu Bi'Shevat.

Purim

  • The unit begins with Memory box, reviewing the story of the megilah as well as mitzvot and customs of the holiday studied in Grades 1 and 2. The unit focuses on the story of the megilah using both contemporary and biblical Hebrew.

Pesach and Shavuot

  • The unit opens a review of the 4 names of the holiday and the story of the exodus studied in Tal Am1 and 2. The unit then focuses on the concepts of Avdut [slavery] and Herut [freedom], examining their manifestations on our seder table, as well as the Pesach Haggadah.
  • The Shavuot unit begins with the Memory box, reviewing the concepts of Sefirat Ha’omer studied in Grade 2. The unit focuses on the Ten Commandments and their significance in the students’ lives, as well as Tikun Leil Shavuot - the custom of Torah learning on the eve of Shavuot.

Yom Ha’atzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim

The Israel unit begins with the memory box, reviewing elements studied in Tal Am 1 and 2, such as Israel’s flag, symbols and hatikvah. The unit focuses on two central themes:

  • A virtual tour of the country familiarizing the students with Eretz Israel. The students make 14 stops in different locations, along the way, examining each location through its biblical/ historical context, as well as its present day reality.
  • The roles of Theodor Herzl and David Ben Gurion in the creation of the State of Israel, including the main principles of the declaration of Independence. These principles, constituting the  foundation of the State of Israel, are linked to the rules studied in the Behatzlacha unit for creating a successful class and maintaining successful learning and to the Ten Commandments, stipulating the fundamental rules of conduct enabling a positive and productive life within society.

Reading and Writing Methods and Activities

  • Teacher reads stories to students.
  • Students read aloud.
  • Daily - student write the day and the taarich [the date] on the board.
  • Describing in Singular/ plural, Masculine/ feminine.
  • The students uses songs in Hebrew, having conversation between them and the teacher, writing paragraphs, read fluently, use correct spelling, increase vocabulary, understand and use proper zemanim [tenses], learn past tense and later in the year, start future tense.

Judaic Studies

Torah/Bible Studies

In third grade, The Matok Torah Program focuses on Parashat Lech Lecha. It  is one of the foundational parshiyot of Jewish life and tradition. In it, God creates a unique relationship, or covenant, in which God promises Avraham multitudes of descendents who will be with God eternally. God also promises the land of Canaan to Avraham and his descendants and requires him and his male descendents perform their part of the covenant in every generation. It describes the origins of the Israelites, and a description of the life of Avram, the first of the ancestors of Israel. The stories of Avraham are extremely dramatic and constitute a copious amount of opportunities to stimulate the student’s interest and curiosity as they anticipate the next part of each story.

Students will be able to:

  • Become independent and literarily astute readers of the Biblical text in Hebrew

  • View Torah as the formative narrative of the Jewish people past, present, and future

  • Understand and value that the land of Israel informs and shapes the historical, theological, and sociological experiences of the Jewish People

  • Develop an appreciation for the sacredness of the Torah as the primary record of the meeting between God and the people of Israel

  • Recognize Torah and as an essential text through which Jews continue to grapple with theological, spiritual, and existential questions

  • Develop a love of Torah study for its own sake and come to embrace it as an inspiring resource, informing their values, sense of moral commitments, and ways of experiencing the world

  • Identify Biblical characters in the story and empathize with the characters involved

  • Know basic Biblical vocabulary

  • Sequence the historical events in this section of the Torah

Tefillah/Prayer

Students will be able to:

  • Understand the meaning and relevance of prayer in an age appropriate manner

  • Relate prayers to daily lives

  • Understand meaning of keywords

  • Explore relationship with God

  • Use prayer as a spiritual self-expression

  • Perform correct choreography of prayers

  • Be familiar with the matbeah (structure) of prayer services

Chuggim/Holiday

Students will be able to:

  • Discuss the meaning and significance of each holiday; laws, traditions, customs, and religious artifacts

  • Recite the relevant tefillot (prayers) of each holiday

  • Connect the ideas and values of the holiday to students’ lives today

Third Grade Mitzvah Project

In third grade, students support SOVA. SOVA provides free groceries and an array of supportive services to over 9,000 individuals of all ages, ethnicities, and religions each month.Third grade students are living the value of, “walking in the way of G-d” by showing kindness and mercy toward others less fortunate than ourselves. (Deuteronomy 5:30). Every Friday, third graders bring and collect canned goods to donate to SOVA.

Language Arts

Students engage in reading, discussion and writing about texts across many genres through Reader’s Workshop and Writer’s Workshop.  They work on improving their reading comprehension skills by making connections between culture and the stories that they produce. The students will build their decoding and fluency skills and increase their vocabulary in both reading and writing.  Throughout the course of the year, students become more sophisticated and independent in discussion and presentation.

As a result of the program, the students will focus on the following skills:

Comprehension

  • Describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

  • Read grade-appropriate spelled words.

  • Consistently read differentiated and age-appropriate texts independently and as a group.

  • Independently apply strategies of sequencing, connecting, predicting, questioning and summarizing.

  • Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking

  • Improve competence with strategies of inferring, comparing/contrasting and critiquing

Research

  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly

  • Recall information from experiences or gather information from print

  • Engage in individual and collaborative small group research and writing projects

Composition

  • Write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes and audiences

  • Introduce a topic clearly in writing through the creation of an effective topic sentence

  • Improve editing skills

  • Regularly engage in the writing process

  • Compose narratives that include a narrator, characters, dialogue and descriptive details

  • Practice sentence variety

  • Practice various writing modes

  • With teacher support, compose clear paragraphs with topic sentences, supportive details and a concluding sentence

  • Understand the functions of different words (nouns, proper nouns, common nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs) and their role in a sentence

  • Apply descriptive words to improve writing

  • Practice guided peer review to provide constructive feedback

Math

The mathematical focus is on developing an understanding of multiplication and division, describing and analyzing properties of various shapes, and developing an understanding of area.

As a result of the program, students will:

  • Round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100 to advance their skills in estimation

  • Use arrays to express multiplication problems and their solutions

  • Apply mathematical properties of multiplication to simplify problems

  • Model, solve and explore a variety of problems to identify meaning for the operations of multiplication and division

  • Understand and explore various fraction models

  • Calculate perimeters and measure areas of shapes

Music

As a group, we study our first wind instrument together, the recorder. The recorder is an easy instrument to learn and will give children the basic skills they will need to study other wind instruments in the future.  By the time children get to 3rd grade, they become pretty good musicians and they know how to play the xylophones and percussion instruments. They play together as a group on the instruments, read and play notes on recorder and continue to explore the joy of improvisation. My favorite lesson play for the recorder is, “Recorder Karate.” It gives them a sense of accomplishment and determination.  Since our 3rd graders play recorder, they also study the woodwind section of the symphony orchestra. Their final project is to construct a fully functional wind instrument with recycled or unused materials at home.

Skills highlighted for this year:

  • Perform rhythmic patterns in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4 and take rhythmic dictation by playing, “Kaboom”
  • Expand vocal range and continue to sing with a healthy tone
  • Develop sight-singing skills
  • Construct a fully functional woodwind instrument
  • Develop a repertoire of songs
  • Experience call and response songs and games from many cultures
  • Demonstrate beautiful tone on recorder while playing fingerings for BAGEDC’D’

Science

Through an integrated science lens of FOSS (Full Option Science System), a research-based science curriculum for grades K-8., students explore topics through a hands-on and inquiry based approach in which they study concepts including matter and energy, structures of life, and the solar system. This type of learning will require students to ask and answer questions about the topics that they are studying, participate in/watch experimentation, and take brief notes from their inquiries.

Matter and Energy

  • Identify how energy can be carried from one place to another by waves, electric currents, and moving objects.

  • Research that stored energy takes many forms.

  • Observe and analyze a chemical reaction.

  • Develop a model to describe that light reflecting from objects and entering the eye allows objects to be seen.

  • Generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information.

Structures of Life

  • Observe and compare properties of seeds and fruits.

  • Investigate and record structures of germinated seeds.

  • Observe, record, and research the life cycle of crayfish and how changes of their environments can be detrimental or beneficial.

  • Collect, organize, and analyze data from life science investigations to build explanations.

Solar System

  • Model the universe and its stars and use rhetorical strategies, including written, visual, and oral presentations to portray the patterns of the movement of the sun, moon, and stars in the sky that can be observed, described, and predicted.

  • Use tools to collect and analyze data to develop logical conclusions and compare results with the predictions

Social Studies

Through the thematic lens of From Sea to Shining Sea, Third Grade focuses on the relationship between geography, economics and our history in relation to earlier peoples who helped shaped our current land.  Students are also exposed to current event and issues which focus on our community, Los Angeles, California and the world. Students examine their own type of connection to both the community and culture.  Studies introduce students to concept of map skills, the beginnings of our nation, explorations of various Native American tribes, and our continued growth of our land today.

Skills we focus on include the following:

Map Skills, Geography, Sequencing

  • Recognize landform features (continents, mountains, plains, rivers, oceans, lakes, etc.)

  • Identify places on a map using compass related instruction, scales, map keys, and grids.

  • Describe the sequencing of land formations and their causes, using language that pertains to time, sequencing, and cause/effect.

Research

  • Conduct short research projects that help build knowledge about a specified topic.

  • Use text features and search tools to locate information relevant to a given topic.

  • Read for a purpose, asking and answering questions to demonstrate an understanding of the text.

  • Take notes through the use of a graphic organizer or template.

Historical Context and Cultural Competency

  • Discuss the importance of good character and the role of citizens in our community, including the importance of participation in our classroom and our school environment.

  • Identify the characteristics of production and exchange in our economy.

  • Draw from historical and community resources to organize sequential local historical events.

  • Describe how each period of settlement helped shaped the land into what it is today.

  • Differentiate between rural, urban and suburban communities.

  • Understand law and how the role of rules are incorporated into our daily lives.

  • Demonstrate and understand the various cultures elements of our environment and how culture defines our present day groups.

 
4th Grade

Art

  • Students are encouraged to use shape, line, and texture in a piece of sculpture, as well as observe it within the school and environment.

  • Students are encouraged to create a feeling within their pieces of artwork, using their knowledge on colors and complementary colors to create an emotion.  A discussion is involved on how each piece has made their classmates feel.

  • We incorporate the study of the Jewish artist, Sandra Silberzweig, to open the discussion of using proportion when drawing faces.

  • Students learn how to create positive and negative space while creating an abstract pair of Shabbat candlesticks.

  • We use the Jewish Holiday of Shabbat to create a woven Challah cover and practice the newly acquired skill of embroidery.

  • A discussion of Master Folk Artists is used to showcase the different techniques that various artist use and plays a role in reflecting life for a depicted time period.

  • Students create a collaged Torah to express movement and give their work of dimension and texture.

  • Each child is encouraged to go through the art making process by experimenting with different art tools and resources available.

  • Students create a representation of a shoe in a drawing and sculptural piece. They interpret reality and fantasy through these pieces of artwork.

  • An elaborated art critique is used at the culmination of each project, giving feedback to their peers and integrating art vocabulary learned.

Hebrew

Tal Am 4 is a continuation of Tal Am 1, 2, and 3. The book is based on the daily life in the classroom, home, and all Jewish Holidays. Grade 4 has been identified as a transitional year during which student undergo changes in language and character development. Therefore, Tal Am 4 focuses on behavior and conduct, and on the construction of a community in which the children can work together in order to promote cooperation and facilitate successful learning.

These concepts are modeled in the Virtual Classroom. Each theme examines the congruency between the main concepts they present and how the Unified class can work to implement them together.

The track is divided in 2 main units:

  1. The Unified Classroom

  2. The Special Classroom

The two units are organized into two discipline-based tracks and are aligned to reinforce the development of learning, thinking, and language skills.

Tal Am is comprised of the following materials:

  • For Students: Workbooks and CDs for acquisition, mastery and creativity, guided readers, and summative assessment.
  • For the Classroom: Interactive posters, flash cards, games, library books for reading reinforcement and enrichment.
  • Tal Am 4, continues to develop the Hebrew environment surrounding the children in the classroom and extending it to the home.
  • In grade 4th, the students are introduced to the analysis tool. They internalize aspects of language skills, through simple conversation and personal opinion.
  • Tal Am continuous to employ the virtual classroom whose students grow and develop together with the student serving as models for the construction of a learning community.

Tal Am 4, focuses on behavior and the construction of community in which the children can work together in order to promote cooperation and facilitate successful learning. The main concepts are presented as daily dilemmas and how the unified classroom can work on solving and implementing their thoughts and opinions together. The unit of Unified Classroom, engages the students with the rules of good manners linking them to Jewish sources.

The Jewish Holidays are introduced through the year as a continuation of material studied in previous years enhanced with text for guided reading, library books, CDs and interactive virtual tool.

Judaic Studies

Social Studies/Israel

Students learn about Israel’s history, geography, political, commercial, and cultural life. Students become familiar with the basic history of modern Israel and the key personalities who inspired and nurtured the dream of a Jewish homeland.  Students develop an appreciation of Israel as both the historic and spiritual center of Judaism. Accompanying this unit is the geography of Israel and extensive map work. There are many opportunities for integration when comparing Israel and California’s geography.

Students will be able to:

  • Recognize the map of Israel, regions and major cities

  • Establish a connection with the Jewish people, homeland and its history

  • Identify important key leaders and personalities and the role they played in the establishment of the state of Israel

  • Develop an appreciation of Israel as a historic and spiritual center of Judaism

Torah/Bible Studies

Fourth grade implements the Matok curriculum, Parashat Shemot, developed by the Schechter Network and the Jewish Theological Seminary. In Parashat Shemot, fourth grade students look at how the children of Israel came down to Egypt, and grew into a nation. They examine the change in Egyptian leadership and how the lives of the Israelites were drastically altered. Students examine the lives of the Israelite slaves and how Moses emerges as a leader.

Students will be able to:

  • View Torah as Kadosh

  • Read Torah in an inquiring, deep, and reverent way

  • Learn Torah using original Hebrew text

  • Develop literary skills to study Torah independently

  • Engage in critical thinking

  • Search for personal meaning in Torah

  • Connect Torah with their lives as Jews

  • See themselves as a link in the chain of Torah understanding and interpretation

  • Prepare to explore traditional commentary

  • Engage with questions about God

  • Grapple with moral issues that arise from the Torah

  • Identify main characters in the story and evaluate characters’ actions

  • Demonstrate understanding of the plot

  • Quote passages and draw conclusions

  • Note Biblical words and phrases that repeat

  • Identify similarities and differences in text

  • Describe verb forms, roots of words, word echoes, word repetitions

Tefillah/Prayer

Students learn the geography of the Siddur (prayer book) and the sequence of tefillot (prayers).  We focus on Tefillat Rosh Chodesh (new month) and the Havdalah (ceremony). During Judaic Studies class, weekday tefillot, and Shabbat services, students delve into the deeper meanings of the teffilot and attempt to create personal connections to the text.  Students will be challenged to connect values inherent in the tefillot with actions in their daily lives. Both the kevah (routine) and kavannah (intentions) of the liturgy are emphasized.

Students will be able to:

  • Recognize symbolic objects and their significance for Havdalah

  • Lead a Havdalah service using the symbolic objects

  • Recite and understand appropriate prayers

  • Recognize the Jewish calendar as a lunar calendar and how the cycle of the moon determines the beginning and end of the months of the year

  • Familiarize themselves with the geography of the Siddur, and the sequence of prayers in the Siddur

Chuggim/Holiday

Fourth grade student build on their knowledge of Jewish holidays through customs, traditions, holiday blessings, and values. Students have an opportunity to present the Jewish holidays which engages their curiosity, creativity, and critical thinking skills. Kadima exposes students to the reasons for celebration, how to celebrate, and the mitzvot that can be performed in honor of each holiday.

Students will be able to:

  • Learn meanings of ritual objects relating to each holiday

  • Learn how holidays are celebrated in Israel and other parts of the world

  • Research the Biblical and historical origin of the holiday

Fourth Grade Mitzvah Project

In fourth grade, students support the organization Shalva. Shalva is the Israel Association for the Care and Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities. Shalva is dedicated to providing transformative care for individuals with disabilities, empowering their families and promoting social inclusion. Students live the value, “Love your neighbor as you love yourself,” V’ahavta l’rayaha kamokha. Students connect with this organization and make a difference in the lives of others less fortunate than themselves.

Language Arts

Readers’ and Writers’ Workshop

Readers’ and Writers’ Workshop is a method used in fourth grade to teach students strategies for reading comprehension and writing fluency.  It is an interdisciplinary program which builds students’ fluency in reading and writing through continuous, repeated exposure to the process of reading and writing.  The structure provides opportunities for differentiation, as well the opportunity for students to self-select what they want to read and write. It fosters a love of reading and writing, and provides students with the time and support they need to grow into fluent readers and writers.

Comprehension skills we focus on:

  • Draw inferences from a text

  • Determine the main idea of a text

  • Determine a theme of a story, drama or poem

  • Compare and contrast themes, settings, and plots of stories within the same genre

  • Apply strategies of sequencing, connecting, visualizing, predicting, questioning, and summarizing

  • Describe a character in depth

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text

  • Explain the differences between poems, drama, and prose

  • Compare and contrast the point of view from which stories are narrated

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text

  • Distinguish literal from nonliteral language

  • Recognize and discuss the literary devices such as simile, metaphor, alliteration, onomatopoeia, personification, and hyperbole

  • Identify and know the meaning of common roots, prefixes and suffixes

  • Use context clues to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary

Composition skills we focus on:

  • Write opinion pieces on topics or texts

  • Write informative/explanatory texts

  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events

  • Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts and feelings

  • Produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose

  • Consider audience and purpose

  • Increase elaboration with details, facts, and examples

  • Apply descriptive details and transition words

  • Use conjunctions that show connection

  • Understand the functions of different parts of speech

  • Employ the correct tenses

  • Recognize run-on and fragment sentences

  • Utilize the correct punctuation

  • Use topic sentences effectively and correctly

  • Improve editing skills

  • Utilize the writing process

  • Publish work within a specific deadline

Spelling and Vocabulary:

Spelling and vocabulary are part of the fourth grade literacy program. Words Their Way is an open-ended individualized spelling program in which students are given words to study in order to discover common patterns. Students learn by word sorting, playing games, labeling and writing. They work individually, with partners, and in small groups to encourage cooperative learning and individual responsibility.  Students practice their words throughout the week, both in class and at home.

Wordly Wise focuses on improving students’ vocabulary by furthering their understanding of new words and concepts. Students are exposed to new words each week. They learn how to identify words in context and how the meaning of words relate to other words. Vocabulary and spelling reviews are given on Fridays.

Math

Goal: To develop understanding and fluency in all four mathematical operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and  to develop an understanding of of statistical thinking, and volume (Go! Math: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Place Value and Operations with Whole Numbers

  • Identifying place value for numbers to 1,000,000

  • Using place value to perform multi-digit arithmetic

  • Using words, models and expanded forms to represent numbers

  • Solving multi-step word problems using the four operations

  • Recognizing that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors

  • Multiplying a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit number

  • Multiplying two two-digit numbers

  • Finding whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors

Fractions and Decimals

  • Performing operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths

  • Generating and analyzing patterns

  • Understanding fraction equivalence and ordering

  • Understanding decimal notation for fractions, and comparing decimal fractions

  • Using equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions

  • Multiplying fractions by a whole number

Geometry, Measurement, and Data

  • Solving problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements

  • Drawing and identifying lines and angles

  • Understanding concepts of angle and measuring angles

  • Classifying shapes by properties of their lines and angles

  • Understanding concepts of volume

  • Identifying median, mode and range

Music

By the time children get to 4rd grade, they become accomplished musicians and they know how to play the recorder, xylophones and percussion instruments. They play together as a group on the instruments, read and play notes on recorder and continue to explore the joy of improvisation. At this age, they are a ready for individual piano lab stations.  In these stations, students learn to create music, play scales and learn intermediate music theory. We have also integrated the use of Garageband on iPads, for the students to explore different instruments and arranging techniques. They also study the string section of the symphony orchestra. Their final project is to construct a fully functional string instrument with recycled or unused materials at home.

Skills highlighted for this year:

  • Improvisation is a key element to exploring their creative side and becoming risk-takers
  • Perform rhythmic patterns in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 9/8, 12/8 and take rhythmic dictation by playing, “Kaboom”
  • Expand vocal range and continue to sing with a healthy tone
  • Develop sight-singing skills and learn to part sing and harmonize
  • Construct a fully functional string instrument
  • Develop a repertoire of songs
  • Experience call and response songs and games from many cultures and study world instruments

Science

The fourth grade students are introduced to fundamental processes and practices in scientific inquiry through FOSS (Full Option Science System), a research-based science curriculum for grades K-8. It was developed at the University of California, Berkeley and provides tools and strategies to engage students in experiences that lead to deeper understanding of the world around us. The three units of study are: Magnetism and Electricity, Exploring Environments, and Solid Earth.   

Magnetism and Electricity

The Magnetism and Electricity Module consists of five investigations, each designed to introduce and reinforce concepts in physical science. Students experience magnetism and electricity as related effects and learn applications of magnetism and electricity in everyday life.

Exploring Environments

The Environments Module consists of four investigations that focus on the concepts that organisms need energy and matter to live and grow, and living organisms depend of one another and on the environment for their survival and the survival of populations. Students design investigations to study preferred environments, range of tolerance, and optimum conditions for growth and survival of specific organisms.

Solid Earth

The Solid Earth Module consists of five investigations, each designed to introduce or reinforce concepts in earth science. The investigations provide students with firsthand experiences with rocks and minerals, and modeling experiences to study changes to rocks and minerals at Earth’s surface.

Social Studies

The fourth grade Social Studies curriculum centers on the study of California. It focuses on the geography and the history of the state. The students learn about the history through multi-text reading, note-taking, charting, and outlining. The students integrate their knowledge with creative writing, plays, class presentations, and related art activities. They begin learning map skills and then progress to the growth and settlement of California. The California expedition is further enhanced by field trips.

Map Skills and Geography

  • Read a map using a map key and symbols

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic features that define places, regions and communities in California through the use of maps, charts, and images

  • Explain and use the coordinate grid system of latitude and longitude to determine the locations of places in California and on Earth

  • Distinguish between the North and South Poles, the equator, the prime meridian, and the hemispheres using coordinates to plot locations

Historical Context and Cultural Competency

  • Describe the social, political, cultural, and economic life and interactions among people of California from the pre-Columbian societies to the Spanish mission and Mexican rancho periods

  • Evaluate the biases and values of different historical figures and sources

  • Look through multiple perspectives and understand how the mission system expanded the influence of Spain and Catholicism and how it impacted the indigenous people

  • Explore the history of the Gold Rush through multiple perspectives including the lives of women, indigenous people, and other marginalized or oppressed groups

  • Discuss how California became a state and how its new government emerged and differed from previous periods

  • Explore the complexities and contributions of immigration past and present as related to California

  • Understand and articulate the structures, functions, and powers of the local and state governments as described in the U.S. Constitution

 
5th Grade

Art

  • Students will understand that the Arts reveal who we are.

  • Mixed media is used, including the incorporation of pens, pencils, and oil pastels to replicate a Marc Chaggal window.

  • Students develop a comprehensive understanding of how artists show space on a 2-D surface.

  • Each student researches a Master Artist, living or not, and creates a replica of their favorite painting.

  • Technology will be used to create a computer-generated piece of art in the style of their chosen artist.

  • Observations will be made in the changes of art materials and styles over a period of time.

  • Art vocabulary terms will be used in a more cohesive manner, like terms used when describing the principles in art.

  • Students will create a 2-D drawing the emphasizes harmony throughout the artwork.

  • Students will understand that the arts are a means of communication.

  • The illusion of space will be created a one-point perspective of the inside of a synagogue.

A critique will be used to share observations on classmate’s artwork, as well as assessing their own.

Hebrew

The Bishvil Haivrit program includes diverse contents and themes integrating the content with linguistics with a varieties of genres including glossary of new words, video and audio clips, interactive activities, and independent reading and listening opportunities.

The program brings Hebrew alive with print and digital media cultivating all aspects of Hebrew language learning: grammar and content, conversations and literature, poetry and factual information, drills and exercises and topics for lively discussion, songs and moral dilemmas, writing assignments and independent reading.

An important aspect of this program is the use of technology. It enhances and supports learning with audio recordings, interactive technology, documentary films, and more.

The  students can speak, read, write, and listen to spoken Hebrew, from authentic resources from Israel. they encounter new viewpoints on daily life in Israel, Jewish tradition and history, and general world knowledge.

The "Bishvil Ha-Ivrit" curriculum and materials encourage an ongoing and dynamic interaction between content, linguistics, and skill development.

The program offers conversations, interviews, articles, notes, questionnaires, and biblical text.

The program delivers a wide interaction between teacher and students. It includes different styles of learning based on a student centered and tailored approach. Methods such as group project based learning (PBL), problem solving situation, inquiries and differentiation.

The book and program gradually builds a sequential progression of increasing length and of texts, spiraling depending on the group level offering richer vocabulary and greater complexity.

Book 1

Speaking and Writing

  • Introduce  and express themselves in conversations on familiar topics, describe city life, their own and in israel specifying geographical sites to enhance  grammatical structures into day to day situation. Students will be able to compare and describe between schools and social connections in Israel.

  • Converse and act-out day-to-day situations through vocabulary presented in the program.

  • Conjugate the main groups of verbs in present tense.

  • Understand simple frequency expressions and formulate questions.

  • Apply the phrases and new vocabulary to new situations.    

  • Use proper grammatical structures such as  prepositions, conjunctions, question words, adverbs, adjectives, and nouns.

  • Express themselves identifying  gender based, single and plural adjectives, verbs, and nouns.

  • Write their own sequence of questions and answers

  • Express themselves identifying  gender-based, single and plural adjectives, verbs, and nouns.

  • Use proper grammatical structures such as  prepositions, conjunctions, question words, adverbs, adjectives, and nouns.

  • Write their own sequence of events in a simple paragraph essay.

Listening

  • To follow simple directions in order to perform tasks in class.

  • To comprehend main ideas by listening to audio conversations.

  • Answer questions based on class conversations.

Reading

  • Comprehend the text and follow directions with specific tasks.

  • Answer questions and provide feedback based on the text.

  • Practice and improve reading fluency with and without vowels.

Book 2

Speaking and Writing

  • Introduce  and express themselves in conversations on authentic israeli topics, based on the City of Tel Aviv and many points of view and aspects for example relating the student to ecological issues and nature preservation in big cities.

  • Converse and act-out day-to-day situations through vocabulary presented in the program.

  • Review conjugation and add the four basic forms of verbs + infinitive adding pronouns and nouns in a fluently and naturally way.

  • To utilize past tense in all persons and verb structures.

  • Identify, prefixes and suffixes of verbs in  future tense, add the correct pronoun endings to the prepositions and combinations and use them in various contexts (including imperative verb form).

  • Apply the phrases and new vocabulary to new situations.    

  • Use proper grammatical structures such as  prepositions, conjunctions, question words, adverbs, adjectives and nouns.

  • Express themselves identifying gender-based, single and plural adjectives, verbs, and nouns.

  • Write their own sequence of questions and answers.

  • Express themselves Identifying gender-based, single and plural adjectives, verbs, and nouns.

  • Use proper grammatical structures such as prepositions, conjunctions, question words, adverbs, adjectives, and nouns.

  • Write their own sequence of events in a simple paragraph essay.

Listening

  • To follow simple directions in order to perform tasks in class.

  • To comprehend main ideas by listening to audio conversations.

  • Answer questions based on class conversations.

Reading

  • Comprehend the text and follow directions with specific tasks.

  • Answer questions and provide feedback based on the text.

  • Practice and improve reading fluency with and without vowels.

  • Interpret longer and more complex texts from the book.

Book 3

Speaking and Writing

  • Express themselves in conversations using metaphors related to shapes, colors and symbols of their own world, and the Jewish world.

  • Deepen and develop conversation based on past and present future tense.

  • Be able to converse and write using  prepositions and correct verbal structures.

  • Discuss topics related to weather in relation to several areas, their own personal mood, humor, environment, animals, and bible cycles.

  • Be able to converse using vocabulary based on daily life and apply new structures using past-tense based on their experiences and memories and relate them to bible stories, Jewish events in history, relationship between humans, animals, friendships, and communication.

Listening

  • To follow  directions in order to perform tasks in class.

  • To comprehend complex and rich ideas by listening to audio conversations.

  • Discuss text based on audio.

Reading

  • Comprehend complex  texts such as fables, folktales Midrashim, authentic texts, articles, and stories.

  • Practice and improve reading fluency without vowels.

Book 4

Speaking and writing

  • Express themselves in conversations on abstract topics with a deeper focus on their own place in the world from their own perspective and  point of view such as dreams, passing time, stories, tales and specific literature.

  • Converse and discuss personal and worldly conflicts and dilemmas.

  • Apply all verb tenses, prepositions and correct verbal structures in all tenses.

  • Identify and apply conjunctions.

  • Identify, prefixes and suffixes of verbs in future tense, add the correct pronoun endings to the prepositions and combinations and use them in various contexts (including imperative verb form).

  • Be able to converse using vocabulary based on daily life and apply new structures to daily life situations.

  • Use proper grammatical structures such as prepositions, conjunctions, question words, adverbs, adjectives, and nouns.

  • Will be able to read and understand complex text such as fables, folktales, Midrashim, authentic texts, articles, and stories.

  • Write their own essays and stories.

Listening

  • To follow  directions in order to perform tasks in class.

  • To comprehend complex and rich ideas by listening to audio conversations.

  • Discuss text based on audio.

Reading

  • Comprehend complex texts such as fables, folktales Midrashim, authentic texts, articles, and stories.

  • Practice and improve reading fluency without vowels.

Judaic Studies

In the Fifth Grade Judaic Studies program at Kadima Day School, students study Jewish history, Torah, Tefillah, and holidays. The goals of this program are to reinforce each student's Jewish identity so that they will deepen their involvement in, and commitment to Jewish life, and be able to relate issues of the past with the present, and make Jewish Studies relevant to their personal experience.

Jewish History

The fifth grade Jewish history unit covers the story of the Jewish people in America, from their early settlement, beginning in 1492, to the challenging events of today. The curriculum combines history, literature, original documents, maps, photographs, and illustrations to create a rich tapestry that is the story of American Jewish life.

Students will be able to:

  • Identify reasons for Jewish Immigration to USA

  • Explain the reason New Amsterdam was established

  • Discuss the importance of American citizenship

  • Identify components that make up the Jewish community

  • Compare and contrast Ashkenazi and Sephardic traditions

  • Discuss issues relating to intermarriage and the importance of Jewish survival

  • Identify major Jewish communities in USA prior to the American Revolution

  • Identify major Jewish personalities who helped the American Revolution

  • Explain how communities and individuals championed religious freedom in the USA

Torah/Bible Studies

Fifth grade uses the Matok curriculum, Parashat Va’era, developed by the Schechter Network and the Jewish Theological Seminary. In Parashat Va’era, fifth grade students, look back at the covenant that God established with the forefathers. Students examine God’s imminent redemption of the Israelites and God’s renewed promise to take the Israelites to be His people and give them the land of Canaan. Students become independent and literarily astute readers of the Biblical text in Hebrew. They engage enthusiastically in the study of ancient, rabbinic, and modern modes of interpretation of the Biblical text.

Students will be able to:

  • Contribute personal ideas about the narrative

  • Identify main characters in the story

  • Demonstrate understanding of plot

  • Evaluate actions and motivation of Biblical characters

  • Identify recurring central themes in unfamiliar texts

  • Develop an understanding of a variety of Biblical metaphors for God

  • Recognize special literary characteristics of the Biblical text (Biblical words and phrases that repeat, verb forms, roots of words, word echoes)

  • Identify similarities and differences in text

  • Distinguish between Midrash and the Torah text and differentiate between p’shat and d’rash.

  • Relate personal concepts of God to concepts of God in the Torah text

  • Compare and contrast Biblical holiday mitzvot with modern day traditions

  • Study the weekly parasha and present a Dvar Torah

Tefillah/Prayer

Kadima’s goal is for all students to be familiar with the Siddur and the order of the daily and Shabbat Tefillah. Fifth grade students, as leaders of the elementary school, will be expected to take on a leadership role in Tefillot services and present a Dvar Torah during Kabbalat Shabbat Tefillah.

Students will be able to:

  • Delve into the deeper meaning and personal connection of  prayer

  • Find connections and relevance to their daily lives

  • Discuss reasons for prayer

Chuggim/Holiday

Fifth grade discusses the deeper meaning of each of the holidays, the key laws, customs and traditions, and blessings, with the hope that students connect the ideas and values represented in their lives today. By immersing students in Jewish traditions, Kadima is engaging their curiosity, creativity, and critical thinking skills. Faculty enriches each holiday by connecting it to mitzvot relevant to the students’ lives. By exposing students to interesting facts about customs from different Jewish communities, Kadima is emphasizing a tradition of diversity.

Students will be able to:

  • Articulate the meanings of ritual objects relating to each holiday

  • Identify differences on how holidays are celebrated in Israel and other parts of the world

  • Research the Biblical and historical origin of the holiday

  • Identify sacred texts that illuminate the spirit and meaning of each holiday

  • Recite blessings relating to each holiday

  • Recognize that by celebrating our holidays we fulfill God’s commandments

Fifth Grade Mitzvah Project

In fifth grade, students are supporting the, “Shoes That Fit” organization. This organization provides new shoes to children in need so they can attend school in comfort, and with dignity, better prepared to learn and play. By performing this mitzvah, students are fulfilling the mitzvah of Someiach Noflim, supporting the fallen. Students, with the help of the Kadima community, collect and deliver 120 pairs of shoes and socks to two local schools in need.

Language Arts

In fifth grade, a blended approach is used for language arts, combining the Reading Workshop philosophy of instruction with core novels that integrate themes of kindness and acceptance, growth and change, and identity.  Over the course of the year, students have the opportunity to read a variety of genres and self-select books. Instruction focuses on analyzing character, recognizing literary devices and plot development, determining genre characteristics, and determining point of view as a means of deepening understanding of a story. Following a Writing Workshop model, students edit their own work and the work of their peers, revising and publishing within specific deadlines. Usage, grammar, and mechanics are all substantial parts of the wiring curriculum. Students learn to research, refine their comprehension and writing skills, and practice media literacy.  

Comprehension skills we focus on:

  • Draw inferences from a text

  • Determine the main idea and key details of a text

  • Determine a theme of a story

  • Compare and contrast themes, settings, and plots of stories within the same genre

  • Apply strategies of sequencing, connecting, visualizing, predicting, questioning, and summarizing

  • Describe a character in depth

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text

  • Compare and contrast the point of view from which stories are narrated

  • Distinguish the author’s purpose in the use of figurative language

  • Recognize and discuss the literary devices such as simile, metaphor, alliteration, onomatopoeia, personification, and hyperbole

  • Identify and know the meaning of common roots, prefixes and suffixes

  • Use context clues to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary

Composition skills we focus on:

  • Write opinion pieces on topics or texts

  • Write informative/explanatory texts including using quotations and citing sources directly

  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events

  • Use dialogue as a descriptor of actions, thoughts and feelings

  • Produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose

  • Consider audience and purpose

  • Increase elaboration with details, facts, and examples

  • Apply descriptive details and transition words

  • Use conjunctions that show connection

  • Employ the correct tenses

  • Recognize run-on and fragment sentences

  • Utilize the correct punctuation

  • Improve editing skills

  • Utilize the writing process

  • Publish work within a specific deadline

Spelling and Vocabulary:

Spelling and vocabulary are part of the fifth grade literacy program.  Words Their Way is an open-ended individualized spelling program in which students are given words to study in order to discover common patterns.  Students learn through word sorts, playing games, labeling and writing. They practice their words throughout the week, both in class and at home.

Wordly Wise focuses on improving students’ vocabulary by furthering their understanding of new words and concepts.  Students are exposed to new words each week. They learn how to identify words in context and how the meaning of words relate to other words. Vocabulary and spelling assessments are given weekly.

Math

Develop fluency in operations with fractions and of division of fractions, to extend division to 2-digit divisor, integrate decimal fractions into the place value system, and to develop an understanding of volume (Go! Math: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Fluency with Whole Numbers and Decimals

  • Understanding place value

  • Solving multiplication and expressions with whole numbers

  • Dividing whole numbers

  • Adding and subtracting decimals

  • Multiplying decimals

  • Dividing decimals

Operations with Fractions

  • Adding and Subtracting fractions with unlike denominators

  • Multiplying fractions

  • Dividing fractions

Geometry and Measurement

  • Graphing ordered pairs in the coordinate plane

  • Graphing data

  • Completing numerical patterns

  • Understanding customary units of weight, length and capacity

  • Converting units using the metric system

  • Finding elapsed time

  • Learning properties of polygons, 2- and 3-dimensional figures

  • Understanding volume

  • Applying volume formulas

Music

By the time children get to 5th grade, they are ready for more advanced musical techniques over all. They play together as a group on the instruments, read and play notes on recorder and continue to explore the joy of improvisation. At this age, they are a ready for individual piano lab stations.  In these stations, students learn to create music, play scales and learn intermediate music theory. We have also integrated the use of Garageband on iPads, for the students to explore different instruments and arranging techniques. They also study the brass section of the symphony orchestra. Their final project is to construct a fully functional brass instrument with recycled or unused materials at home.

Skills highlighted for this year:

  • Explore 20th Century composers and atonal music compositions
  • Improvisation is a key element to exploring their creative side and becoming risk-takers
  • Perform rhythmic patterns in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 9/8, 12/8 and take rhythmic dictation by playing, “Kaboom”
  • Expand vocal range and continue to sing with a healthy tone
  • Develop more sight-singing skills and learn to part sing and harmonize
  • Construct a fully functional brass instrument
  • Experience call and response songs and games from many cultures and study world instruments
  • Add different parts and develop more stability and independence on ensemble pieces
  • Focus on one’s own part while playing with others
  • Demonstrate improvisation technique
  • Experience collaboration. Through instrumental music, students practice working together, sharing responsibility, and compromising with others to accomplish a common goal. Through these experiences, they gain confidence and start to learn that their contributions have value even if they don’t have the biggest role.  

Science

The fifth grade students are introduced to fundamental processes and practices in scientific inquiry through FOSS (Full Option Science System), a research-based science curriculum for grades K-8. It was developed at the University of California, Berkeley and provides tools and strategies to engage students in experiences that lead to deeper understanding of the world around us. The three units of study are: Mixtures and Solutions, Living Systems, and Earth and Sun.   

Mixtures and Solutions

Chemistry is the study of the structure of matter and the changes or transformations that take place within those structures. Learning about the properties and behaviors of substances and systems of substances gives us knowledge about how things go together and how they can be taken apart and gives us the opportunity to use and develop models that explain phenomena too small to see directly. Learning about changes in substances can lead to the development of new materials and new ways to produce energy and resources such as clean drinking water.

The Mixtures and Solutions Module has five investigations that introduce students to fundamental ideas about matter and its interactions. Students come to know that matter is made of particles too small to be seen and develop the understanding that matter is conserved when it changes state—from solid to liquid to gas—when it dissolves in another substance, and when it is part of a chemical reaction. Students have experiences with mixtures, solutions of different concentrations, and reactions forming new substances. They also engage in engineering experiences with separation of materials. Students gain experiences that will contribute to the understanding of crosscutting concepts of patterns; cause and effect; scale, proportion, and quantity; systems and system models; and energy and matter.

Living Systems

The Living Systems Module has four investigations that focus on systems as the unit of study. The idea of a system is one of the grand integrating (crosscutting) concepts that pervades all of science. Students start by looking at Earth as the interaction of four Earth systems or subsystems—the geosphere, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. The focus of the module then turns to the biosphere as students explore ecosystems and organisms in terms of their interacting parts.

In this module, students think about systems on different scales - nutrient and transport systems within an organism that moves matter and provides energy to the individual organism, and feeding relationships in ecosystems that move matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment. Students come to understand through a variety of experiences that plants get the materials they need for growth primarily from water and air, and that energy in animals’ food was once energy from the Sun. There are many opportunities for students to explore how human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life can have major effects on these systems. Students gain experiences that will contribute to the understanding of crosscutting concepts of patterns; scale, proportion, and quantity; systems and system models; and energy and matter.

Earth and Sun

The Earth and Sun Module provides students with experiences to explore the properties of the atmosphere, energy transfer from the Sun to Earth, and the dynamics of weather and water cycling in Earth’s atmosphere. Other experiences help students to develop and use models to understand Earth’s place in the solar system, and the interactions of Earth, the Sun, and the Moon to reveal predictable patterns - daily length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of stars in the night sky. Students gain experiences that will contribute to the understanding of crosscutting concepts of patterns; cause and effect; scale, proportion, and quantity; systems and system models; and energy and matter.

Social Studies

The fifth grade Social Studies curriculum centers on the development of the United States from early Native Americans through 1850 with an emphasis on the people who were already here, when and from where others arrived, and why they came. Students learn about the colonial government, the ideals of the Enlightenment, and the English traditions of self-government. They recognize that ours is a nation that has a constitution that derives its power from the people, that has gone through a revolution, that once sanctioned slavery, that experienced conflict over land with the original inhabitants, and that experienced a westward movement that took its people across the continent. Studying the cause, course, and consequences of the early explorations through the War for Independence and western expansion is central to students’ fundamental understanding of how the principles of the American republic form the basis of a pluralistic society in which individual rights are secured.  The students learn about the history through multi-text reading, note-taking, charting, and outlining. The students integrate their knowledge with creative writing, plays, class presentations, and related art activities as well as through their Jewish history curriculum, which focuses on Jews in America.

  • Students describe the major pre-Columbian settlements including how geography and climate influenced the ways various nations lived and their varied economies and systems of government.

  • Students trace the routes of early explorers and describe the early explorations of the Americas. They are able to describe the entrepreneurial characteristics of early explorers and the technological developments that made sea exploration by latitude and longitude possible.  They explain the aims, obstacles, and accomplishments of the explorers, sponsors, and leaders of key European expeditions and the reasons Europeans chose to explore and colonize the world, trace the routes of the major land explorers of the United States, the distances traveled by explorers, and the Atlantic trade routes that linked Africa, the West Indies, the British colonies, and Europe, and can locate on maps of North and South America land claimed by Spain, France, England, Portugal, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Russia.

  • Students describe the cooperation and conflict that existed among the American Indians and between the Indian nations and the new settlers.  

  • Students understand the political, religious, social, and economic institutions that evolved in the colonial era. They understand the influence of location and physical setting on the founding of the original 13 colonies, and identify on a map the locations of the colonies, identify the major individuals and groups responsible for the founding of the various colonies and the reasons for their founding, describe the religious aspects of the earliest colonies,

  • Students explain the causes of the American Revolution, understand its course and the consequences of the Revolution.  They understand how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution, the people and events associated with the drafting and signing of the Declaration of Independence and the document’s significance, including the key political concepts it embodies, the origins of those concepts, and its role in severing ties with Great Britain.  Students describe the views, lives, and impact of key individuals during this period.

  • Students understand the course and consequences of the American Revolution. They are able to identify the major military battles, campaigns, and turning points of the Revolutionary War, the roles of the American and British leaders, and the Indian leaders’ alliances on both sides. Students can describe the contributions of France and other nations and of individuals to the outcome of the Revolution and identify the different roles women played during the Revolution.  Students understand the personal impact and economic hardship of the war on families.

  • Students know the location of the current 50 states and the names of their capitals and complete a research report on a state.

 
Experiential Learning

Experiential Learning

Day (and overnight) trips add a special component to our classroom curriculum. Trips have varied over the last several years and this year have included the following:

Sacramento Field Trip

The state capital of California has a rich history of fortune, opportunity, and independence. From gold panning to touring underground areas of the city long forgotten, 4th and 5th Grade students have plenty of opportunities to learn, explore, and appreciate their state of origin.

Astrocamp - Science & Adventure Camp

An overnight camp for 4th and 5th Grade students located in the beautiful pine forests of the San Jacinto Mountains. Using a unique mix of science and space exploration, Astrocamp activities include telescope observations, beginning and advanced rocketry, planetary and solar science, and is coupled with mountain adventure activities like camp outs, mountain biking, archery, rock climbing and bouldering.

California Science Center

5th Grade students Learn through hands-on experiences in permanent exhibit galleries that explore human inventions and innovations, the life processes of living things and the Earth's ecosystems.

Santa Barbara Mission

The Santa Barbara Mission was established on the Feast of Saint Barbara, December 4, 1786 and was the tenth of twenty-one California Missions to be founded by the Spanish Franciscans. More than 200 years later, the Mission continues to be the chief cultural and historic landmark in the city of Santa Barbara. 4th Grade students explore this stunning landmark as part of their California History curriculum.

Autry Museum

3rd Grade students transport to the Wild West in this engaging field trip. Topics discussed include Native American history and culture, California gold rush history, and westward expansion. Students also get a broad overview of the museum and its exceptional collection of historical artifacts and Western art.

City Hall

City Hall is the heart of Los Angeles and it has a story to tell. 2nd Grade students learn the story of our city, our local government at work, and our community celebrations. The building proudly displays marble, tile, granite and bronze handwork from local artists.

Skirball Cultural Center

Kindergarten has a opportunity to explore Noah’s Ark at the Skirball, the permanent, award-winning children's and family destination. They play, climb, build, explore, make believe, and make friends—all while exploring a floor-to-ceiling wooden ark, filled to the rafters with whimsical animals sharing in the timeless story and together envision a better world.

1st Grade attends a performance by BOXTALES Theatre Company, which brings myths and folktales from around the world to young audiences using masks, movement, music, and storytelling. Their shows and assemblies fire imaginations, inspire creativity, strengthen cultural pride, encourage tolerance, and engage young people in the excitement and immediacy of live performance.

2nd and 3rd Grade tour the three galleries that encompass the permanent exhibit, “Visions and Values: Jewish Life from Antiquity to America.” This program gives students an understanding of culture—both Jewish culture and other cultures present in Los Angeles. They consider the cycles of life that people experience culture to culture, learn about and compare holidays through discussion and encounters with objects, and think about ways to improve their school or community while learning about museums, synagogues and other culturally significant gathering places.

4th Grade students discover the art and science of architecture by exploring Skirball’s stunning design created by Architect Moshe Safdie.

5th Grade students explore the experiences of people who have immigrated to America from around the world, learning their personal stories and examining related objects from a variety of cultures and time periods. Through immersive storytelling, students re-enact an American immigrant experience at the turn of the twentieth century by undergoing the process of entering Ellis Island, attending public school in 1908, and searching for an occupation in the midst of a bustling New York City neighborhood. They learn about the harrowing challenges many immigrants to the US have faced and the striking commonalities and stark differences among their experiences.

Physical Education

Physical Education

The focus of the elementary physical education program is the introduction and exploration of physical education skills and concepts.  As an important part of the elementary school program that uniquely contributes to the school's overall goals, physical education emphasizes the total development of the child (i.e. physical, motor, cognitive, social, and emotional development). It is critical at the elementary level that students be guided through a series of developmentally appropriate experiences and activities that promote a desire to engage in physical activities, promote a sense of self worth, encourage cooperation, and self control, and lead to choices that promote a healthy life style. 

To deliver a quality elementary physical education program, 60 minutes of instruction per week is recommended. This instruction is to include vigorous physical activity, diagnosis and learning of neuromuscular skills, information about physical activity and fitness, and time to enjoy the use of skills and knowledge. Even though recess is an important part of an elementary school, it should not be used as a substitute for physical education instruction.