Kadima’s Middle School (grades 6-8) offers a rigorous academic program, designed to create an environment that fosters lifelong learning in our students.

The Middle School program ensures that each student grows and develops his/her personal skills, talents and interests to the fullest. We offer a balanced and integrated core program of Language arts, Mathematics, Judaic Studies, Science, Hebrew Studies, Social Studies, Technology, Arts and Music.  We prepare our middle school students for a successful and meaningful academic and social experience in high school and beyond. Our administration and faculty monitor the individual progress of each student using both qualitative and quantitative (benchmark assessment and school-wide screening) measurements consistently.  The Kadima Middle School offers advantages of small class size (averaging 12-15 students per class), integrated technology (each student utilizes an iPad), and a vibrant and excellent academic program.

 
 
Middle School Electives

 

Middle School Electives

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Electives are offered on a rotational basis, with students have the opportunity to pursue new interests on a quarterly basis.  The following list is a sampling of electives that have been offered:


    Photoshop & Digital Imaging

    This elective will include an introduction to the basic features of the program, learning as many skills and techniques as possible throughout the course. Some practical exercises will include retouching and correcting images, merging and captioning them, and preparing them for print.


    Yearbook Design

    Students enrolled in Yearbook Design gain knowledge in layout and design with an emphasis on publishing the final yearbook product.


    Creative Writing & Video Production

    Students will write stories, poems, songs, and produce videos to develop their storytelling skills. No essays! Write for fun.


    Strategy Games

    This elective will offer students the opportunity to get away from their computers and play board and strategy games. Suggestions: Jenga, Yahtzee, Mankala, Trivial Pursuit, Clue etc.


    Visual & Merchandising Design

    Design a visual display for Kadima merchandise. You will also be creating a window display for a local store. This course will focus on combining architecture, design, sculpture, painting, and entrepreneurial skills to create fun art projects geared towards merchandising and advertising.


    Rock Band

    In this elective, students get to explore instrumentation, arranging, composing and learning to play as an ensemble. The culmination of this elective includes performances and recordings, on my equipment and their own personal iOS devices via Digital Performer and Garageband.


    Drama

    This is an elective for those who are acting in or want to participate in the Hamilton play at the end of the year.


    Painting and Furniture Design

    This class will incorporate many aspects of fine art including design, sketching, acrylic painting, collage and printmaking. The focus of the class will be student directed. Students will decide if they want to paint on a canvas or create an original design on a piece of furniture.

     
     
    Language Arts
     
     

    Language Arts

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    6th Grade

    Students sharpen the skills gained in 5th grade. Prewriting strategies and the elements of the analytical paragraph are reviewed, with emphasis placed on proofreading, incorporation of quotations, and blending literary analysis with textual support. Vocabulary acquisition is developed through reading comprehension and exercises. A writing component, ensures students’ application of the new words. A major focus of the year is the analysis of literature, with the aim of furthering critical reading and thinking. At least two novels, a variety of short stories, poems, and plays are read. Standard literary terms are reviewed and more advanced ones are introduced. Grammar involves a review of the eight parts of speech as well as subjects and predicates and advanced sentence types (complex and compound-complex). Punctuation centers on the correct use of the comma, semicolon.  Reading may include ,The Giver, Things Not Seen, The Westing Game, and various short stories and poems.

    Skills we focus on include the following:

    • Read and comprehend a variety of genres (fiction, non-fiction, poetry) that reveal originality, imagination, a personal perspective, and a social/historical perspective.

    • Find textual evidence to support a claim and articulating that claim clearly during class discussion.

    • Compose focused, analytical paragraphs featuring quotes from the literature to support a given claim.

    • Write persuasive paragraphs and essays featuring logical and convincing reasons to support a position.

    • Practice peer review, constructive feedback, and the writing revision process beyond mechanical errors.

    • Review the parts of speech and parts of a sentence in increasingly complex instances, and introducing grammatical units (phrases, sentence types).

    • Define new vocabulary words from the literature studied and using them in student writing.

    • Review known and identifying and defining new literary terms.

    • Engage in independent and collaborative research projects across multiple perspectives and experiences.

    7th Grade

    An emphasis on ethics and identity through the theme of evolution guides the study of literature and other nonfiction texts in 7th grade. Students find quotes to support statements on characters' motivations and societal issues. They correlate the texts to society and make connections between literature, pop culture, and history. Students write analytical, expository, and persuasive paragraphs and essays.  Students engage in oral discussion and debate. Consistent attention to further honing their proofreading skills is emphasized. Vocabulary acquisition involves learning new words through exercises, reading comprehension, and creative writing. At this level the study of mechanics and grammar are imparted on an as-needed basis to students based on the development of their writing. Works studied might include the following: To Kill a Mockingbird, The Secret Life of Bees, Lord of the Flies, Farenheit 451, and various short stories, plays, and poems..

    Skills we focus on include the following:

    • Read and comprehend a variety of genres, specifically short stories, novels, poetry, plays and essays that reveal originality, imagination, a personal perspective, and a social/historical perspective.

    • Engage in Socratic discussions of the reading, making sure to support claims with textual support and to interact responsibly and diplomatically with one another in a student-directed discussion model.

    • Write focused analytical paragraphs and four to five paragraph essays featuring quotes from the literature to support a given claim.

    • Practice peer review, constructive feedback, and the writing revision process beyond mechanical errors.

    • Enhance vocabulary through study of words from Vocabulary Workshop and incorporating those words into their own writing.

    • Study verbals, phrases, clauses, and sentence structure.

    • Make interactive presentations demonstrating grammar skills.

    • Continue exploring and understand multiple perspectives and audience.

    • Engage in independent and collaborative research projects across multiple perspectives and experiences.

    8th Grade

    The focus in 8th grade English is strengthening critical thinking and writing to prepare students for high school.  Accordingly, students engage in close contextual analysis to determine how literary components integrate to make a work a masterpiece, and they are asked to question why an author does what he/she does and if he/she is effective. The historical and social background of a work is examined to demonstrate how the work is a product of its time. Students read at least two novels and one Shakespearean play, as well as short stories and poetry. Poetic forms are also utilized as models for their own poetry. Advanced literary, poetic, and rhetorical techniques are introduced, and students make a variety of oral presentations. Both analytical and expository papers are expected to contain sophisticated syntax, diction, and style. Research and quotation inclusion follow MLA guidelines. Vocabulary acquisition involves learning new words through exercises, reading comprehension, and writing. Grammar centers on those aspects that reflect and impact student writing. Students delve into clauses, verbals, agreement, modifiers, sentence combination, and parallel structure. Technology is employed to enrich student learning and achievement. Works studied might include the following: Speak, Animal Farm, Night, and Romeo & Juliet, and various short stories and essays.

    Skills we focus on include the following:

    • Read and comprehend a variety of genres (fiction, poetry, drama, essays) that reveal originality, imagination, a personal perspective, and a social/historical perspective.

    • Find textual evidence to support a claim and articulating that claim clearly during class discussion and Socratic seminars.

    • Compose focused, analytical three and five paragraph essays featuring quotes from the literature to support a given claim.

    • Practice peer review, constructive feedback, and the writing revision process beyond mechanical errors.

    • Define new vocabulary words from the literature studied and using them in writing.

    • Review known literary terms as well as identifying and defining new ones and exploring how and why such devices are utilized in a given work.

    • Share oral presentations that focus on rhetorical skills (tone, audience, pacing, sentence length).

    • Continue exploring and understand multiple perspectives and audience.

    • Engage in independent and collaborative research projects across multiple perspectives and experiences.

     
    Advisory

    Advisory

    Kadima’s Advisory Program is based on the practices of Responsive Classroom and is a middle school program designed to support the social-emotional development and needs of sixth-eighth graders in a non-academic setting.  Each grade level has one to two advisors who act as a support system, mentor and guide through the advisory discussions. Topics that are explored through our advisory program include: stress, anxiety, organization, personal relationships, social dynamics, human development, and real-life issues that emerge throughout the year and impact student lives.  

     
    Mathematics

    Mathematics

    Throughout the course, Introduction to Algebra, students learn basic algebraic concepts and how to apply those concepts in a real-world setting. Basic math and geometry skills are reviewed and then used to develop vital algebraic skills and practices.  These skills are used to solve word problems, quadratic functions, equations, inequalities, and many other algebra concepts. Students will leave this class prepared to take Algebra 1 and with an understanding of the practical value of Algebra.

    6th Grade

    Laying the Foundation for Pre-Algebra
    (Glencoe: Mathematics: Applications and Concepts Course 2)

    By sixth grade, students are expected to have mastered the four basic operations in elementary school. Sixth grade math is designed to enhance students’ basic math skills and number sense by using formulas and problem solving. Students are introduced to the concept of real numbers, and begin operations involving negative integers. They also learn to solve area, perimeter, and circumference of 2-dimensional shapes and volume, as well as surface area of 3-dimensional shapes.

    Algebra and Decimals, Statistics, Integers, and Fractions

    • Understanding Decimal Patterns

    • Analyzing Data

    • Solving Operations with Integers

    • Understanding Linear Equations and Functions

    • Solving Operations Including Fractions, Decimal and Percents

    • Applying Fractions

    Geometry and Measurement

    • Applying Algebra to Geometry and Measurement

    • Applying Algebra to 2- and 3-Dimensional Figures

    Proportional Reasoning

    • Understanding Ratios and Proportions

    • Applying Percents

    • Understanding Probability

    7th Grade

    Laying the Foundation for Algebra
    (Glencoe: Pre Algebra)

    Pre-Algebra focuses on developing fluency with rational numbers and proportional relationships. Students extend their elementary skills and begin to learn algebra concepts that serve as a transition into formal Algebra and Geometry. Students learn to think flexibly about relationships among fractions, decimals, and percents. Students learn to recognize and generate equivalent expressions and solve single-variable equations and inequalities. Students investigate and explore mathematical ideas and develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations. Students analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. Students apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to their life experiences.

    Integers and Rational Numbers

    • Understanding Tools of Algebra

    • Identifying and Solving Operations with Integers

    • Solving Equations

    • Factoring and Solving Operations with Fractions

    • Identifying and Solving Operations with Rational Numbers

    • Converting Ratios, Solving Proportions, and Finding Percents

    Linear Equations, Inequalities,  Functions and Geometry

    • Solving Equations and Inequalities

    • Understanding Functions and Graphing

    • Applying Real Numbers to Right Triangles

    • Identifying and Applying Algebra to 2- and 3-Dimensional Figures

    Statistics and Polynomials

    • Understanding Statistics and Probability

    • Applying Algebra to Polynomials and Nonlinear Functions

    8th Grade

    Understanding Concepts and Application of Algebra
    (Glencoe: Algebra)

    Integers, Equations, Functions, Powers, Roots

    Understanding the language of Algebra

    • Writing equations

    • Applying distributive property   

    Identifying and operations with integers

    • Graphing integers

    Solving equation

    • One step

    • Multi step  

    Solving proportions

    • Applying proportions formulas

    Graphing functions and relations

    • Identifying functions

    Writing equations

    • Point-slope form

    • Slope-intercept form

    Applying rules of powers and roots

    Polynomials, Factoring, Quadratic and Exponential Functions and Inequalities

    Solving operations with polynomials

    • Multiplying binomials

    Identifying Factors

    Factoring Trinomials and special factors

    • Using distributive property

    Graphing quadratic and exponential functions

    Solving inequalities

    Growth and Change: April-June
    (Chapters 13-15)

    Systems of Equations, Radical Expressions, Rational Expressions, and Equations

    Graphing systems of equation

    • Eliminating using addition, subtraction, and multiplication  

    Identifying radical expressions

    • Simplifying radical expressions

    • Solving radical expressions

    Structure and Method Algebra
    (McDougal Littell: Honors Algebra: Structure and Method: Book 1)

    In 8th grade Algebra I, students delve deeper into the foundations of algebra, using Algebra, Structure and Method: Book 1 as a core text.  Students are encouraged to develop advanced problem-solving skills, perseverance, and creativity through explorations of mathematical topics of progressively greater complexity.

    Equations, Real Numbers, and Polynomials

    • Solving equations with variables

    • Working with real numbers

    • Solving equations in word problems

    • Solving operations with polynomials

    • Factoring polynomials

    Fractions, Functions and Linear Equations

    • Solving operations with fractions

    • Applying fractions to ratio and proportions

    • Applying fractions to equations

    • Applying fractions to percent

    • Solving equations with 2 variables

    • Solving problems in the coordinate plane

    • Determining the slope of a line

    • Using the slope-intercept formula

    • Exploring linear and quadratic functions

    • Solving systems of linear equations

    Inequalities, Rational and Irrational Numbers, Quadratic Functions

    • Solving inequalities

    • Graphing and solving problems involving inequalities

    • Solving combined inequalities

    • Using absolute value in open sentences

    • Applying properties of rational numbers to decimal and square roots

    • Applying the Pythagorean Theory

    • Solving operations with radicals

    • Solving quadratic equations with perfect squares

    • Completing the square

    • Using the Quadratic Equation

     

     
    Experiential Learning

    Experiential Learning

    Overnight trips add a special component to our classroom curriculum. The 6th and 7th grade travel together. Their trips have varied over the last several years and have included the following:

    Wasewagan Summer Camp & Retreat

    Our 6th and 7th Grade students will be traveling on a three day, two night adventure to Wasewagan Summer Camp & Retreat during the Spring semester. A wonderful opportunity for the students to engage in an overnight outdoor team-building experience. The surrounding mountain environment makes Camp Wasewagan perfectly situated for a variety of outdoor and environmental education programs as well as other activities. They will explore collaboration exercises, life sciences, and leadership programs (and more) as they hike, fish, bike, climb, and learn during this exciting program.

    Olympic Park, Washington

    Students will have the opportunity to participate in a 5 day overnight at the Olympic Park Institute in Olympic Park, WA, (http://www.yni.org/opi/index.html) located just 20 miles west of Port Angeles on Lake Crescent in the Olympic Park National Forest. The overnight generally takes place in mid-March. This intensive science based program will focus on inquiry-based learning and will complement the students’ curriculum at Kadima.

    New York

    Students will participate in a 5-day, 4 night trip to New York City. The New York overnight will take place in the spring. During this trip students will trace the route our ancestors took as they made their way into America, the new homeland. We will follow the path in which Jews settled in New York, visiting Ellis Island, Borough Park, Crown Heights, the Upper Westside and much more. We will explore not only how the Jews came to America, but have the opportunity to experience the rich culture of New York City.

    8th Grade Israel (Tel Aviv Partnership) or Washington D.C.

    In the 8th grade, all students will either participate in a five-day trip to Washington, D.C. or a two week delegation as part of the Israel Partnership program.

    Washington D.C.
    On the Washington D.C. adventure, students learn U.S. History and government in one of the most powerful cities in the world. Each student will feel, hear, see, and understand American history through themes of personal risk, commitment, sacrifice, and national values. Students become players in the dramatic history of America while exploring the Capitol building and the Smithsonian Museums. They will come to understand the complexity of US history and visit many of the memorials that line the mall, as well as explore the United States Holocaust Museum and gain a deeper appreciation of the Jewish story of the past, and the importance of remembering that past as we look to the future. Designed to enhance the 8th grade social studies curriculum, students will gain a richer understanding of our history, the consequences of choices, and of their role in our continuing American story.

    Isreal
    The Israel Partnership delegation is a two-week trip that takes place during the weeks surrounding Yom Ha-Zikaron (Israel’s Remembrance Day) and Yom Ha-atzmaut (Israel’s Independence Day). The program includes on-going contact between the schools through e-mail, video conferences and is highlighted by a trip to Israel in May where a delegation of students is hosted by the school and its students. Our school and students host our partners in Los Angeles in the Fall.

     
    Science

    Science

    6th Grade

    Earth Science

    Students in 6th grade participate in the study of earth science and explore various geological elements and concepts. Students review scientific method then investigate maps, plate tectonics, and the Continental Drift Hypothesis. Students study the forces involved in shaping the earth’s surface including earthquakes, weathering and erosion. Students study thermal energy, energy resources and energy movement in ecosystems. There is an emphasis on ecology and the human impact on the environment. Students will participate in laboratory assignments to acquire a broader comprehension of the material as well as an understanding of the procedures and equipment used in the lab.

    Students will:

    • Collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources.
    • Conduct individual and group experiments to test hypotheses and draw conclusions.
    • Apply findings in oral, written, and visual presentations.
    • Develop research skills through the use of print and electronic sources and create effective basic research bibliographies.
    • Participate in a school-wide science fair.
    • Synthesize complex ideas, in written, discussion, visual, graphic and oral presentations, to present balanced information with clarity, conciseness, and thorough presentation skills.

    7th Grade

    Life Science

    Understanding the Phases of Life
    McGraw-Hill: e-text Life Science

    Structures and Functions of Life  

    • Classifying Organisms

    • Identifying the Cell

    • Parts of the cell

    • Functions of the cell

    • Differentiating between an animal and plant cell

    • Understanding genetics and DNA

    • Punnett squares

    • Understanding the theory of Evolution

    Bacteria and Plants  

    • Investigating bacteria in nature

    • Differentiating bacteria and viruses

    • Identifying protists and fungi

    • Differentiating the two

    • Identifying plants

    • Seedless and seed

    • Understanding the energy process in plants

    Human Body Systems

    • Identifying the parts of the human body systems

    • Understanding the functions of the human body systems

    • Applying all parts of the human body systems

     

    8th Grade

    Physical Science

    Develop Fundamental Understanding of Natural Systems
    McGraw-Hill: e-text Physical Science

    Motions and Forces

    • Understanding position, motion, speed, velocity, acceleration

    • Differentiating and apply Newton’s laws of gravity

    • Identifying simple machines and their uses

    • Understand buoyant force, pressure and density of fluids

    Energy and Properties of Matter  

    • Identifying energy and then sources of energy

    • Using thermal energy

    Classifying Matter

    • Physical properties

    • Chemical properties   

    Understanding the states of matter and their behavior

    • Solid, liquid, and gases

    Discovering parts of the atom

    • Protons

    • Neutrons

    • Electrons

    Identify the elements on the periodic table

    Chemical Reactions

    • Understanding chemical reactions

    • Differentiating mixtures and substances

    Identifying properties of solutions  

    • Acid and base solutions

     
    Hebrew and Judaic Studies

    Hebrew and Judaic Studies

    Hebrew Language

    The Bishvil Haivrit program integrates content with linguistics in a variety of genres including: a glossary of new words, video and audio clips, interactive activities, and independent reading and listening opportunities. 

    The program cultivates all aspects of Hebrew language learning: grammar and content, conversations and literature, poetry and factual information, drills and exercises, topics for lively discussion, songs and moral dilemmas, writing assignments, and independent reading.

    An important aspect of this program is it's use of technology; enhancing and supporting learning with audio recordings, interactive technology, documentary films, and more. Students can speak, read, write, and listen to Hebrew from authentic resources in Israel. They encounter new viewpoints about daily life in Israel, Jewish tradition and history, and general world knowledge.

    The "Bishvil Ha-Ivrit" curriculum and materials encourage an ongoing and dynamic interaction between content, linguistics, and skill development through conversations, interviews, articles, notes, questionnaires, and biblical text. It supports different learning styles based on a tailored student-centered approach incorporating group project based learning, problem solving situations, and differentiation.

    The program gradually builds a sequential progression of increased text length, richer vocabulary, and greater complexity.


    Book 1

    Speaking and Writing

    • Introduce and express themselves in conversations on familiar topics, describe city life (their own and in Israel) specifying geographical sites to enhance  grammatical structures in day-to-day situations.

    • Compare and describe schools and social connections in Israel.

    • Converse and act-out day-to-day situations through program vocabulary.

    • Conjugate main verbs groups in present tense.

    • Understand simple frequency expressions and formulate questions.

    • Apply phrases and vocabulary to new situations.    

    • Use proper grammatical structures such as  prepositions, conjunctions, question words, adverbs, adjectives, and nouns.

    • Express themselves by identifying gender-based, single and plural adjectives, verbs, and nouns.

    • Write their own sequence of questions and answers.

    • Write their own sequence of events in a simple paragraph essay.

    Listening

    • Follow simple directions in order to perform tasks in class.

    • Comprehend main ideas by listening to audio conversations.

    • Answer questions based on class conversations.

    Reading

    • Comprehend the text and follow directions with specific tasks.

    • Answer questions and provide feedback based on the text.

    • Practice and improve reading fluency with (and without) vowels.

    Book 2

    Speaking and Writing

    • Introduce and express themselves in conversations on authentic Israeli topics using many points of view.

    • Converse and act-out day-to-day situations through vocabulary presented in the program.

    • Review conjugation and add the four basic forms of verbs + infinitive adding pronouns and nouns in a fluent and natural way.

    • Utilize past tense in all persons and verb structures.

    • Identify prefixes and suffixes of verbs, in future tense, add the correct pronoun endings to the prepositions and combinations, and use them in various contexts including imperative verb form.

    • Apply phrases and new vocabulary to new situations.    

    • Use proper grammatical structures such as prepositions, conjunctions, question words, adverbs, adjectives, and nouns.

    • Express themselves by identifying gender-based, single and plural adjectives, verbs, and nouns.

    • Write their own sequence of questions and answers.

    • Write their own sequence of events in a simple paragraph essay.

    Listening

    • Follow simple directions in order to perform tasks in class.

    • Comprehend main ideas by listening to audio conversations.

    • Answer questions based on class conversations.

    Reading

    • Comprehend the text and follow directions with specific tasks.

    • Answer questions and provide feedback based on the text.

    • Practice and improve reading fluency with (and without) vowels.

    • Interpret longer and more complex texts from the book.

    Book 3

    Speaking and Writing

    • Express themselves in conversations using metaphors related to shapes, colors, and symbols of their own world as well as the Jewish world.

    • Deepen and develop conversation based on past, present, and future tense.

    • Be able to converse and write using prepositions and correct verbal structures.

    • Discuss topics related to weather in relation to several areas: their own personal mood, humor, environment, animals, and bible cycles.

    • Be able to converse using vocabulary based on daily life and apply new structures using past tense based on their experiences and memories and relate them to bible stories, Jewish events in history, relationship between humans, animals, friendships, and communication.

    Listening

    • Follow directions in order to perform tasks in class.

    • Comprehend complex and rich ideas by listening to audio conversations.

    • Discuss text based on audio.

    Reading

    • Comprehend complex texts such as fables, folktales (Midrashim), authentic texts, articles, and stories.

    • Practice and improve reading fluency without vowels.

    Book 4

    Speaking and Writing

    • Express themselves in conversations on abstract topics with a deeper focus on their own place in the world - from their perspective and point of view - such as dreams, passing time, stories, tales, and specific literature.

    • Converse and discuss personal and worldly conflicts and dilemmas.

    • Apply all verb tenses, prepositions, and correct verbal structures in all tenses.

    • Identify and apply conjunctions.

    • Identify prefixes and suffixes of verbs in future tense, add the correct pronoun endings to the prepositions and combinations, and use them in various contexts including imperative verb form.

    • Be able to converse using vocabulary based on daily life and apply new structures to daily life situations.

    • Use proper grammatical structures such as  prepositions, conjunctions, question words, adverbs, adjectives, and nouns.

    • Be able to read and understand complex text such as fables, folktales (Midrashim), authentic texts, articles, and stories.

    • Write their own essays and stories.

    Listening

    • Follow directions in order to perform tasks in class.

    • Comprehend complex and rich ideas by listening to audio conversations.

    • Discuss text based on audio.

    Reading

    • Comprehend complex texts such as fables, folktales (Midrashim), authentic texts, articles, and stories.

    • Practice and improve reading fluency without vowels.

     

    6th Grade Judaic Studies

    Jewish History
    In 6th grade, students study the history of the Jews from our earliest ancestors in the Land of Israel, to our dispersion in the Diaspora, through the Jewish experience in America in the 1880's.

    Students will be able to:

    • Identify primary differences between the early Israelites and their ancient neighbors: the concept of monotheism and the Torah

    • Describe the Torah as a moral and ethical code, the center-piece of the Jewish value system

    • Identify and describe temptations that faced Jews to either adopt or resist  Hellenistic ways

    • Explain how intolerance within the Jewish community brought about conflict

    • Compare their lives to the lives of our ancestors

    • Describe differences between Jewish life in Israel and the diaspora

    • Describe Jewish life without a temple

    • Identify ways in which Jews in different periods of time adapted to their time and place

    • Identify causes of persecution of the Jews in medieval Europe

    • Analyze how our ancestors influenced future generations of Jews

    • Describe the differences in beliefs and observances within American Jewry

    Torah/Bible Studies

    In 6th grade, students study the Matok curriculum on Parshat Ba’Midbar, developed by the Schechter Network and the Jewish Theological Seminary.

    Students will be able to:

    • Organize listed events in the Torah narrative in chronological order

    • Compare the location of the Israelites at the beginning and end of Ba’Midbar

    • Explain the names of Sefer Ba’Midbar

    • Suggest reasons for census at this time in the Israelites journey

    • Diagram the Israelite camp

    • Suggest spiritual reasons and meanings for the setup of the camp

    • Represent Birkat Ha’kohanim in a graphic

    • Illustrate understanding of commentaries

    • Define the role of God, Moshe and the Israelites in this parasha

    • Predict content by finding repeating words

    Middle School Tefillah/Prayer

    Students will be able to:

    • Delve into the deeper meaning and personal connection of  prayer

    • Find connections and relevance to their daily lives

    • Discuss reasons for prayer

    • Be familiar with the order of the daily and Shabbat Tefillah in the new middle school siddur 

    • Recognize various rituals and melodies in the spirit of Jewish pluralism

    • Demonstrate leadership by leading services

    • Navigate their way through a Shacharit and Kabbalat Shabbat service

    • Participate in a Torah service

    • Create, plan, and lead a creative tefillah services

    Chaggim/Holidays

    Students will be able to:

    • Identify key laws, traditions, customs and symbols associated with each holiday

    • Discuss the deeper meanings of each of the holidays

    • Connect the ideas and values to actions in their daily lives

    • Identify Biblical sources of the holidays

    • Recite relevant prayers relating to holidays

    Sixth Grade Mitzvah Project

    In  sixth grade, the students chose to support the Wildlife Conservation Society that protects wild plant and animal species and their habitats. Students are fulfilling the mitzvah of Safeguarding the Earth, Shmirat Ha’adama. Students work as a class to come up with ideas on how to raise money and awareness for their organization.

     

     

    7th Grade Judaic Studies

    Jewish History
    In 7th grade, students study the period of Jewish History from Eastern European Jewry in the late 1800s, to Modern Jewry in the United States today.  We cover the pogroms of Russia, World War 1 and 2, the Holocaust, the Birth of Israel and Modern American Jewish life.

    Students will be able to:

    • Explain how the pogroms changed the lives of Russian Jews

    • Describe the Jewish response to violent and economic hardship

    • Describe the challenges that faced Russian Jewish immigrants

    • Describe the different visions for creating a Jewish state

    • Identify successes and failures that affected Jewish support of Zionism

    • Analyze the effect of World War I on Jewish communities in the diaspora

    • Name ways American Jewry helped Jews after World War I

    • Describe how religious and cultural life developed for American Jews

    • Examine the freedom Zionist settlers found in Palestine and how it affected their Jewish identity

    • Identify causes for Jewish Arab tensions in British ruled Palestine

    • Compare and contrast Jewish life of West European Jews to East European Jews

    • Describe how Hitler’s “final solution” changed world Jewry forever

    • Identify challenges that faced both Jews and Arabs in Palestine

    • Examine how Jewish unity helped Jews overcome challenges

    • Describe how political and social activism reinforced the Jewish American identity

    • Name achievements of the modern State of Israel

    • Identify sources of conflict between Palestinians and Israelis and efforts in pursuit of peace

    Torah/ Bible Studies

    In 7th grade, students study the Matok curriculum on Parashat Korach developed by the Schechter Network and the Jewish Theological Seminary. In this unit, students explore the concept of a machloket / disagreement in a constructive way or destructive way, and are asked whether they agree that Korah’s words are an example of the latter. Throughout this unit, students consider what is an appropriate way to criticize or complain and what makes a critique or complaint inappropriate, disrespectful, destructive or unjustified. Using the text, personal situations, and current events, students think about the nature of leadership and dissent, and the concept of choice.

    Students will be able to:

    • Analyze the complaints of Korach and his company against Moshe

    • Compare the rebellion of Korach to other Biblical rebellions

    • Examine Moshe as a leader and discuss his qualities and attributes.

    • Analyze the words of the characters in the parasha

    • Compare and contrast the claims and  punishment of Korach and his followers

    • Engage in critical and analytical thinking

    • Search for personal meaning in Torah

    • Connect Torah with their lives as Jews

    • See themselves as a link in the chain of Torah understanding and interpretation

    • Prepare to explore traditional commentary

    • Engage with questions about God

    • Grapple with moral issues that arise from the Torah

    Chuggim/Holidays

    Students will be able to:

    • Identify the traditions, customs, symbols, and prayers relevant to each particular holiday

    • Research Biblical, historical or Rabbinic sources for each holiday

    • Find personal meaning and relevance of each holiday and its celebration

    • Assume leadership roles in leading holiday activities

    Mitzvah Project

    In  seventh grade, the students chose to support Chai Lifeline. Chai Lifeline’s programs and services meet the unique emotional, social, and financial needs of families living with serious pediatric illness or loss. Students are fulfilling the mitzvah of Gemilut Chasadim, showing compassion and kindness for others. Students work as a class to come up with ideas on how to raise money and awareness for their organization.

     

     

    8th Grade Judaic Studies

    The overall goal of the eighth grade is to explore the ancient Jewish conversation about what is Peoplehood, what it means to be part of the Jewish people, and how it has enabled the development of a rich and unique civilization based on social justice, study of Torah and text, communal responsibility and Tikkun Olam. Exploring Jewish Peoplehood focuses on relationships and connections: between Jews in different locations, across historical time-periods and living in different realities.

    Students will be able to:

    • Define the meaning of “Collective Belonging”

    • Articulate what it means to be part of a community and how it plays a role in students’ life

    • Define the rights and responsibilities we have as active members of the Jewish people

    • Brainstorm ideas on the responsibility students have in the future of the Jewish people and Jewish civilization

    • Define the concept of  “Mutual Responsibility “

    • Analyze the role they play in their responsibility toward other people

    • Give examples of Kol Yisrael Areivim Zeh Ba’zeh, (All Israel (Jews) are Responsible for Each Other).

    • Recognize the tension between particularistic and universalistic values, and their application to the Jewish people,

    • Examine our relationship with Israel, both as a land, and a modern State: What is the relationship built on, and how do we make that relationship meaningful?

    • Discuss the purpose of the State of Israel. Is it an end in itself or a means to an end that is focused on the continuity of the Jewish People?

    • Evaluate the relationship between Israel and Jewish communities worldwide

    • Articulate what the Jewish People should do to keep Israel as a core element of Peoplehood

    • Examine diversity and pluralism within the Jewish community

    • Compare and contrast the differences between Judaism and other religions

    • List constituent parts of the Jewish civilization (land, language, customs, laws etc.,) that are the most important today for the future thriving of the Jewish People

    • Discuss what can, or should be, the actions or behaviors of a peoplehood Jew that demonstrates his or her commitment to Jewish life

    Chuggim/Jewish Holidays

    Students will be able to:

    • Recognize that Jewish holidays are purposeful occurrences that draw their power from multiple sources; the natural world and its seasons, myth, religious, traditions, folk customs and historical events in the life of our people.

    • Identify the holiday cycles and how it parallels natural and historical cycles of the world

    • Identify how each holiday is different and significant for us at varying stages of our life

    • Examine different commentary on each holiday and know that there is no one interpretation or one authority on a holiday’s meaning

    • Develop their own commentary and find personal meaning and relevance

    Mitzvah Project

    In eighth grade, the students are part of the Builders of Jewish Education’s Better Together Program. Once a month, students visit residents at the Jewish Home for the Aging. The goal is to establish and build relationships with Jewish senior citizens in the community. This program allows the different generations to interact on many different levels. Students live the mitzvah of Honoring the Elderly, Hiddur Pnei Zaken.

     
    Social Studies

    Social Studies

    6th Grade

    Students in 6th grade explore the ancient world and the origins of its dominant cultures. The class begins with the origins of humanity in the Paleolithic Age through the Agricultural Revolution. Students will learn how humans domesticated plants and animals and began the transition from roving hunters and gatherers to sedentary farmers. They investigate how the development of farming gave rise to the first cities and complex societies. This course focuses on the four primary river valley cultures, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Ancient India and Ancient China, before transitioning to the Greco-Roman world.

    Skills we focus on include the following:

    • Students describe what is known through archaeological studies of the early physical and cultural development of humankind from the Paleolithic era to the Agricultural Revolution.
    • Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Kush, including locating and describing the major river systems and discuss the physical settings that supported permanent settlement and early civilizations.
    • Students trace the development of agricultural techniques that enabled the emergence of cities as centers of culture and power.
    • Students Trace the evolution of language and its written forms.
    • Students develop research skills through the use of print and electronic sources and create effective basic research bibliographies
    • Students write a research report on a topic in line with their interests and the curriculum of the class.
    • Students understand the complexities and value in both multiple primary and secondary sources as they apply to historical analysis and apply their learning in oral and written presentations.
    • Students synthesize complex ideas, in writing, discussion, and oral presentations, to present balanced information with clarity, conciseness, and thorough presentation skills.

    7th Grade

    Students in 7th grade continue to study the historical trends, forces, developments and events around the World. The course begins with review of monotheistic religions and the differences and similarities of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. They then learn about the history, culture and philosophies of Medieval Africa, Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia, and China. Students study Medieval Europe with an emphasis placed on the everyday life of people from different social classes. Students investigate the birth of the Modern Age with the European Renaissance and Age of Discovery. Students learn about the resulting growth of Enlightenment philosophy and the new examination of the concepts of reason and authority, the natural rights of human beings and the divine right of kings, experimen­talism in science, and the dogma of belief. Finally, students assess the political forces let loose by the Enlightenment, particularly the rise of democratic ideas and the French Revolution.

    • Students recognize the influence of past events in relation to present and future developments.
    • Students use a variety of maps and primary source documents to interpret human movement, including major patterns of migration, the frictions that develop between population groups, and the spread of ideas, technological innovations, and goods.
    • Students analyze the rise of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. They understand the relationship between religion and the social and political order.
    • Students develop research skills through the use of print and electronic sources and create effective basic research bibliographies.
    • Students write a research report on a topic in line with their interests and the curriculum of the class.
    • Students synthesize complex ideas, in writing, discussion, and oral presentations, to present balanced information with clarity, conciseness, and thorough presentation skills.
    • Students discuss the expansion of various cultures and civilizations through military conquests, treaties, with emphasis on cultural development and progression. Students will understand the impact of the growth of cities, ideas, trade routes, and other contributing factors that led to developments in areas of science, geography, mathematics, philosophy, medicine, art, and literature.

    8th Grade

    Students in 7th grade study the ideas, issues, and events from the American Revolution and the framing of the Constitution up to the Industrial Age, with an emphasis on America’s role in the war. Throughout the year, there is an emphasis on the lives of both famous and ordinary Americans with an emphasis on the role of Jewish Americans in the early history of our country. The class begins with a review on the founding of European settlements in the Americas with a focus on the thirteen original colonies. After reviewing the development of America’s democratic institutions founded on the Judeo-Christian heritage and English parliamentary traditions, particularly the shaping of the Constitution, students trace the development of American politics, society, culture, and economy and relate them to the emergence of major regional differences. They learn about the challenges facing the new nation, with an emphasis on the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War. They make connections between the rise of industrialization and contemporary social and economic conditions.

    Skills we focus on include the following:

    • Students recognize the influence of past events in relation to present and future developments.
    • Students use a variety of maps and primary source documents to interpret human movement, including major patterns of migration, the frictions that develop between population groups, and the spread of ideas, technological innovations, and goods.
    • Students develop research skills through the use of print and electronic sources and create effective basic research bibliographies.
    • Students write a research report on a topic in line with their interests and the curriculum of the class.
    • Students distinguish valid arguments from fallacious arguments in historical interpretations through identifying bias and prejudice in historical interpretations.
    • Students explain the central issues and problems from the past, placing people and events in a matrix of time and place.
     
    Team Sports & P.E.

    Team Sports and Physical Education

     

    Through the San Fernando Valley Private School League, Kadima Middle Schoolers have the opportunity to participate in a variety of competitive team sports. Any student who is interested in participating in a team sport is welcome to do so. Our program hinges on the notion that athletics are not solely about learning to win, but learning to be a leader and a team player. Allowing any of our students to participate, regardless of skill or ability ultimately leads to good physical, emotional and social growth. Kadima athletes have earned league championships in basketball, volleyball, and soccer.

     

    Teams currently in place, include:

    • Girls Soccer
    • Boys Soccer
    • Girls Basketball
    • Boys Basketball
    • Girls Volleyball
    • Boys Volleyball
    • Boys Flag Football
    • Physical Education

    6th Grade

    The 6th grade theme is “Learning Through Cooperation”. During the first year of middle school we provide our students with the opportunity to discover how their bodies work while providing them with the opportunity to explore their personal talents. Step-by-step, they learn basic motor skills before moving on to sport-specific skills. This allows them to improve their personal abilities, boost their self-esteem and move with confidence. Students will be introduced to the following:

    • Combine skills for practice in lead up games. (a team, individual, or dual activity leading to an organized sport).
    • Engage in cooperative games that will be used as lead-up games for traditional sports.
    • Participate in variety games and challenging skills such as juggling and tininkling will be used to improve eye hand, eye foot coordination and rhythm.
    • Become aware of the interaction of the circulatory and respiratory system in conditioning for health fitness.
    • Play lead up games where students recognize the validity of rule application while accepting fairness will apply.
    • Work in cooperative groups providing specific positive feedback to peers.
    • Keep a yearly progression of their height, weight, body fat percentage, flexibility, muscular strength and endurance.
    • Demonstrate leadership skills before class.
    • Run a mile under a standardized time for student’s age.
    • Throw a variety of objects, demonstrating both accuracy and distance.
    • Design and play small group games that involve cooperating with others to keep an object away from opponents (basic offensive and defensive strategy-for example, by throwing, kicking, or dribbling a ball).
    • Design and refine a routine, combining various jump-rope movements so that it can be repeated without error.
    • Demonstrate correctly activities designed to improve and maintain muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and cardio respiratory functioning.
    • Participate in games, sports, dance and outdoor pursuits, both in and outside of school, according to individual interests and capabilities.
    • Recognize the role of games, sports, and dance in getting to know and understand people of diverse cultures.

    7th Grade

    The 7th grade theme is “Taking Acceptable Risks Through Problem Solving”. This transitional period between 6th and 8th grade will encourage appropriate risk taking by providing students exciting new activities that require creative thinking and problem solving in a controlled, safe environment. Students will also be introduced to individual sports as well as team sports. Students will also build upon and use basic motor skills as well as sports specific skills learned from 6th grade Physical Education.

    Students will be introduced to the following:

    • Engage in individual as well dual sports
    • Describe ways to use the body and movement activities to communicate ideas and feelings.
    • Participate in vigorous activity for a sustained period of time while maintaining a target heart rate.
    • Identifying proper warm-up, conditioning, and cooling-down techniques and the reasons for using them.
    • Understand the principals of spin and rebound as well as begin to experiment with spins of various types such as: counterclockwise, clockwise, backspin and topspin.
    • Understand how various ball spins can be used to gain strategic advantage in competition.
    • Concerning motor learning, students should be able to understand that performance is measurable in terms of technique, accuracy, distance, and speed.
    • Charting their own motor skill development in specific activities and events.
    • Accept and respect the decisions made by game officials-whether they are students, teachers, or officials outside of school.
    • FIT guidelines for physical exercise, which are the appropriate frequency, intensity, and time required for benefits to be accrued in each health-fitness component.
    • Principles of overload, progression, and specificity in physical conditioning.

    8th Grade

    The 8th grade theme is “Working as a Team to Develop Strategies for Success.” This curriculum concentrates upon team activities. Through each activity an emphasis is placed on increasing muscular flexibility, strength and endurance along with cardio respiratory endurance. Students are encouraged to compare themselves to age level health standards and not to one another.

    Students will be introduced to the following:

    • Recognizing relationships between skills learned and applying those skills to other sports.
    • Understanding the principals of strategy through offensive and defensive sport techniques.
    • Development of a plan for a healthy lifestyle taking into account exercises that incorporate the FIT guidelines taught in grade seven as well as the principals of training.
    • Learn the appropriate intensity level of exercise while calculating their heart rate and understand the importance of cardio respiratory conditioning.
    • Be able to distinguish the health-related fitness components of cardio respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition.
    • Concerning their self-image and personal development they will develop skills to help reduce stress. Their higher level of motor achievement provides a basis for establishing new personal goals that they can realistically obtain.
    • Concerning their social development they will be able to accept personal responsibility for their behavior and resolve individual and group conflicts.
    • Practice appropriate ways of learning new skills or sports on his or her own.
    • Improve and maintain appropriate body composition.
    • Recognize long-term physiological, psychological, and other benefits that may result from regular participation in physical activity.
    • Recognize in playing team sports that rules are fair to all and allow for safe participation.
    • Understand how growth in weight and height influence the mechanical nature of performance in physical activities.
     
    Technology

    Technology

     
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    Kadima students learn to integrate technology into their daily learning in a variety of ways. In elementary grades, students are exposed to computer technology in their individual classrooms as well as in our Library and Publishing Center, which includes iMac desktop systems. Each classroom is equipped with projector system, document camera, and/or active board allowing for connectivity to the internet and/or interactive learning. Students are taught the basics of keyboarding, software use, and the foundations of technology as education tools and resources.

    In middle school, Kadima offers an applied technology program which includes hands-on experience in cutting edge technologies, which have in the past included everything from robotics, video production, music composition, animation, and more. To effectively integrate technology into various learning opportunities, Kadima middle schoolers have access to iPads and digital textbooks. Further, most of our middle-school classrooms are equipped with SMART white boards, transforming our classrooms into centers of interactive learning where students are engaged and inspired and teachers can be innovative in their teaching.

    One of the main objectives of the technology program is creating students ready and able to meet the challenges of the workforce needs of their future.